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Film Prophet's Movie Reviews Page 9

 

Andrei Rublev (1969)
Starring Anatoli Solonitsyn, Ivan Lapikov, Nikolai Grinko, Nikolai Sergeyev, Irma Raush, Rolan Bykov

Film Prophet's Review...
Directed by Andrei Tarkovsky, the true biographical account on fifteenth century Russian Cathedral painter Andrei Rublev is blessed with talent. In the artistic freedom and the divine quest of humanity, the religious themes flow through the entire movie from meditation to whimsy rituals to endless medieval invasions. The story runs at over three hours about a single artist monk in harmony and goes on from the observations of the painter in a turbulent period. As for the viewing treatment, it is an experience of the sequences as autonomous ideas. There is no manipulation and one can interpret how the viewer sees it as transfer. It strives to elucidate the human spiritual condition and struggle. Nothing artificial appears in the film unless it is created by fine art but even that is valid. Filmmakers like Tarkovsky have the talent of cinematography, as the director himself has comparisons to the title character, Andrei Rublev, in painting. Both have methods of dedication to an artistic attitude not gone to disregard. The film is in entirely black and white and stark in composition. One can be mesmerized by the cinematography of land, water, and structure complemented by the offbeat music tune. In an opening sequence, a man goes on a hot air balloon with a camera view looking downward. There are plenty of extra helpful camera shots and images to aid in the sensation of art over individual plot. The power clasps in the beauty of the film with complex people yet simple grounds. The story really serves as a repertoire of chapters in adult life. The main course of the film is through one's inner life soiling the monumental constructs of long spiritual belief with lifeless space in a stuffing environment of male peasants, or God's servants. To believe in drawing as the expression of mind, the challenging imaginative piece bares crises of faith and lone men's eventual redemption. Rublev really acts as a bystander or a witness than a true plot protagonist. His paintings aren’t pointed out until the end in color in recap. It does not show him paint the walls, rather just positioning him in the photography of the small church interiors. Rublev and his couple fellow nomad monk look by their eye and browse… peasant lives are enriched by temporary amusements from the jester, a crucifixion in terms of man's redemption as a metaphor to Christ in the snow, a pagan ritual, apparitions craft temptation and distressing choices for Rublev to make between death or illicit contact, carrying torches to start a fire in a Cathedral, and laborers building a church bell. The pagan moments are almost hallucination sequences by the eerie pious sound and new characters. The tedium and wonders of the camera admits the scenes, relevant or pointless, that are part of an account of a mystical viewing. In fact, staying in alone is truly peaceful in harmony than associated with the evil, or people’s different perspectives on things, of others through believers and sinners in one God. The acting by generally a male leading cast is featured by some traveling characters and there’s little known about the bearded monks. They communicate to each other with theological arguments about philosophy on religious aspects and ignorance, with poetry at nature exploring existentialism and repentance at the core of conversations. Numerous quotes spatter out such as, my soul cries for eternal rest, it's a great sin to reject a God given gift, and no one lives forever. The quiet knowledge and sadness by the characters confined by humanity are captured from lingering selective shots between the chapters in the film in an ultimate transcendent realism. The serene pace is deliberate yet moving by the art and music to keep one in the film. In most scenes, it is an illustration of people interaction without words, but with movement of a patient lens in solid position. Irony in the fusion, Rublev resists to find beauty in such a turbulent setting in a movie that has so much tangible splendor that it's the elusive eternal possessions that are missing in which soul is what really matters.

Final Grade: B+/B

Stolen Kisses (1968)
Starring Jean-Pierre Léaud, Claude Jade, Delphine Seyrig, Michael Lonsdale, Daniel Ceccaldi, Claire Duhamel

Film Prophet's Review...
The French movie is directed by François Truffaut, as character Antoine Doinel attempts to return to civilian life after a dishonorable discharge from the military in the early opening. Adulthood is something that can not be averted. The movie is really another chapter and continuation to Truffaut’s The 400 Blows film and his character of Antoine Doinel. Jean-Pierre Léaud is the same actor who was Antoine as a boy in the original revolutionary landmark film, so it is interesting to watch him grow and see what he can do now with the same director in a color picture. It was different watching a sequel in color with some new performers though in a story years later on from a superb black and white original French film. The movie does not nearly match the poetic aptitude of the first or the pure naive themes despite the small letters and notes in the film that float around. Antoine has odd adventures through several jobs - hotel clerk, private detective, and a stock boy at a shoe store. He follows others and never has much to say than to just look at the opposite person. Naive and determined, he roams around from place to place while checking out numerous of things around the place and the people, mostly as the detective. Some individuals are revolting and so are their actions, such when he works at the Hotel and two detective men visit some girl sleeping. It starts out strange like the camera angles, with jump cuts following and spying to the resulting meddling scenes. Antoine meets a lot of characters, all of whom have somehow been trounced by something. There’s a bunch of shadowing, tailing, and loitering around. Through his jobs, the farcical Antoine plays role-play as to say this is what the main character would do and be at this position later at life. However, the movie sometimes is silly and absurd at points that this film was taken as a mild comedic approach. The world may be different or bizarre, and a young man may be confused about his heart. The main point of the story is exploring Antoine's relationship with long-time girlfriend Catherine. This is sincerely done by ambiguity of not seeing each other often in the film yet they're very vibrant and happy when shown together. Antoine’s mischievous romantic ventures are short and incoherent, and a bit mystifying when he visits whorehouses and finds random prostitutes in long skirts and high heels on the streets. His actions are perplexing because he has a girlfriend in Christine, and the final ten minutes of the film is in finale somewhat. The movie spends more time investigating temporary people and his jobs than the actual young relationship between the two. It hardly shows up due to the haziness of the movie's own story objective. The center of the film makes it so that this relationship is hollow when Antoine works his jobs and sees other women. The bottom line to Truffant is that men know little about romance and devotion to a woman.

Final Grade: C+/C

The Battle of Algiers (1966)
Starring Brahim Hadjadj, Jean Martin, Yacef Saadi, Ugo Paletti

Film Prophet's Review...
A French Colonel Mathieu discovers the hiding place of Ali La Pointe, the final and lead member of the National Liberation Front in Algeria, the second largest nation in Africa. The film shows the Algerian revolution from both sides, from freedom versus government power. Both sides have trouble trusting one another. It was the war of independence in the then French colony of Algeria. The Algerians are seeking independence and the French army simply won’t move out, so the Algerians retaliate. In some scenes, the French use torture to the forlorn and weak people to question for information and location of the whereabouts of others. This is contrasted when the Algerians plant bombs in cafes and shops. When the Muslim women are sneaking past checkpoints to their assignments, there’s a sense of danger for someone and the women still go through with the plans. They are all rebellious people for humanity, even the children. The black and white film by Gillo Pontecorvo is based on a military commander’s memoir and the film does not contain any newsreel footage. Nonetheless, the acting is realistic much so as the depictions of the young pilfering at shotguns to seize while shooting at French soldiers at dead on range… sneak, shoot, and then leave concluding a scene. Usually whoever has the outnumbered chances in physical street brawls is defeated. The film is mainly dedicated to killing policemen, as there is no background or rule to anyone or anything before hand. The only professional actor is Jean Martin. The unaccredited cast isn't prominent, though the acting is very pragmatic, yet the film is purely devoid of any emotional character link. Brahim Hadjadj as Ali La Pointe is really the focal point and should have more to do besides having a revolutionary mentality and looking angry. The sympathy is towards a group of people in crowds of masses not particularly singling out anyone since it is a revolution by nation. The percussion score by Ennio Morricone triumphs. Along with a documentary style narration jolting in flashes, the film is composed in erratic episodes with dates and times from 1954 to 1962. They are little segments into on a fine general plotline with sketchy areas. Distant in view, there are guillotine methods and firing squad executions from coercion, the peaks of the film. The Algerians are depicted as terrorists in their own land by the French. They live in poverty, unemployment, and unequal rights. After the roaming female roles before the center of the movie to the ensuing explosions, the film loses its main set course towards slim events heading into political aspects and leader speeches in front of small army groups. The dialogue becomes tactical on warfare and steep to dark lighting, reestablishing warfare talks that aren't fully enduring. Men are useless at finding peaceful solutions. The weight of pursuit is by scenes of invading by raids in homes of the helpless in a military search for knowledge. The film opens and ends with the same chronic hideout scene of four guys in a dark dugout space concealed from the French army behind a wall. They are silent perpetually to the finish in what is really the first scene that comes to mind towards the movie.

Final Grade: B/B+

Scoop (2006)
Starring Scarlett Johansson, Hugh Jackman, Woody Allen, Ian McShane

Film Prophet's Review...
The movie follows an American student journalist, Johansson, visiting London who happens to grasp an evocative murder mystery scoop. She also finds the possibility of romance with a Brit aristocrat, Jackman, the suspect. The vanishing ghost of a dead reporter, McShane, tells her prematurely that the aristocrat has eliminated twelve women and is the Tarot Card Killer in which he was unable to encapsulate before his death. The ostensible London-set comedy features the second creation between director and writer Woody Allen with actress Scarlett Johansson. Allen plays the reluctant accomplice and magician who brings her up on stage for a trick and after the show, she's eager to pursue the case she hears during it from the ghost. Both have brisk verbal personalities, almost mirroring each other bar from different gender and age. They speak with a zesty volume, but that's just the active characters. It's the chemistry between Allen and Johansson that's particularly gleaming. The amusing element in the story is when the two dispute false understandings. Any older actress who would play this character would probably be very annoying. Scarlett is on no account that and makes her character a resounding piece to the movie’s effervescence. The whiny Allen gibes are the most jeering moments due to his blundering speech and fibs. ‘Land is so difficult to come by now especially outdoors.’ Being everlastingly fussing and doubting in problematic tricky situations is his movie trademark. This is really a supporting role for him, as in the comic relief. Though at some points he fits in as the center of attention like the card tricks he performs to small groups of people, still getting the movie's best lines. For the first half, the movie is more on personal introductions than social commentary, besides on the London atmosphere and scenery. The use of London has texture to lifestyle. The movie resembles a black comedy, the type where death is played for laughs, though the movie never shows any clear moments of it. There’s a grim reaper, but isn’t a significant portion. The supernaturalism never is supernatural with astonishment all the time. There aren’t many scenes of raising voices and arguing back and forth as one can imagine from the trailer. The lighthearted fun tone involves diminutive murder guessing because the story contains not enough suspicion for a while. The dialogue does not necessarily advance the mystery for the first half, as it is generally between the acquaintance of the characters of Johansson and Jackman around the private country side and the location areas of London. They talk about personal small background notes as if the audience is expected to care, or at least retain. It has a knack to want to know people instead of divulging into any kind of mystery or progressing clues in the first half. However, the movie’s ending is as unpredictable as outcomes in quality magic tricks. Woody centers at the end during the film's highest investigation peak of secrecy prying. Before the end, the film finally settles down under the main cast and develops. They decide and argue that the aristocrat must either be guilty or not guilty simply based upon lifestyle and personality. The acting is much superior to anything else, especially between Scarlett and Woody figuring out Jackson. In conclusion, the final sequence and acting make up for it. The mystery story, ample in the second half, is concise on early interpretations discerning playful snooping that carries out in every subsequent fraction. The mystery development is somewhat inexistent for a while. It jumps with vigorous energy and false stories one can believe or not as the only suspect is a respectable upper class man. The clues are really short and brief speculations. It is disabled to get into the wayward mysteriousness, as the story spends time to distinguish the aristocrat, describing his background, better than the movie's mystery or comedy side, in which was the real punch-line. The one vulnerability someone may not know could be the one thing that a life hinges on.

Final Grade: B-/B

Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006)
Starring Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly, Gary Cole, Sacha Baron Cohen, Michael Clarke Duncan, Leslie Bibb

Film Prophet's Review...
Towards high-stakes professional stock car racing, a national NASCAR winner, Ricky Bobby, and his best friend partner form a Shake and Bake duo on the race as a snooty French ex-formula racing nemesis collides on winning in first. The audience of the movie will generally be fans of Ferrell's past comedy movies he’s been in. From the trailer, it looks conceiving as a dense comedy story, though not totally true. The comedy material mostly consists of spoken potty humor conveyed from rugged men and even a couple little boys. The wit is made from lyrical content in the script. It scatters along with the charisma and sense of frequently wanted to laugh when Ferrell is on verge to say something for a short duration because it’s supposed to be funny. Almost every line is due for random hilarity on some level of verbatim in casual conversation. The humor is not mean-spirited or insolent, though there are crude stereotypes in a way such that of the homosexual French driver and the script makes a big deal about his sexual orientation. However, the story slightly breaks a third within, bar from the fast comedy, it purely wasn't aimed to go to anywhere from start to finish, unlike Ricky Bobby on the track. The film itself often likes to promote its own endorsers such as Powerade and Wonder Bread. The movie takes a pit stop to note the infinite number of sponsors as well. The movie is somewhat a crude, funny, live-action version of Pixar's Cars. Lightning McQueen shares common traits with Ricky Bobby. There are autographs, the popular endorsements, female supporters, and all that in the opening sequences. Both are central characters who begin the story on top of their game with fame and success in mind. Their antagonism is unplanned. Their fast beginning then suddenly slows a mile down after some trauma sets in. Following it, it leaves the two deserted from the racing life and it takes a while until the end for another official race for them to occur. In the meantime, gags, like the knife in thigh, are sited in the mix instead of the plentiful honorable messages the animation has. Numerous characterizations frequently show up for many short stints of little comedy spurts... a high majority are humorous. The first true laugh is from Ricky’s negligent father who comes into young Ricky’s class to lecture for a short time in front of a young classroom about fast speed. Like his speech, the editing is super fast and paces right through scenes. “How did he get down to his underwear that fast?” Repeatedly as a racing car goes around a track, the comedy arrives whether it’s from quick loud dialogue or shown off camera in presentable jokes with the actors, as it is deserving of lots of laughs. Ferrell is complemented by the versatile acting of John C. Reilly, as well as several others. The two sons are verbally humorous and outrageous. Cole has slimy allure to the father character, and Amy Adams' boost of energy to her time in the film is gratifying and amazing when she shrieks out her energetic sermons with enthusiasm, acting that is found in elite type of positions. Ricky’s crew also gets in a few bits. The subversive and best moment for Ricky was car bumping front on with a cop. The uproarious knock on Applebee's is risibly affable cleared by motivation touts in the course of countless short comedy bursts that garner above typical new era comedies.

Final Grade: B-/B

John Tucker Must Die (2006)
Starring Brittany Snow, Jesse Metcalfe, Ashanti, Sophia Bush, Arielle Kebbel, Jenny McCarthy

Film Prophet's Review...
In this teen romantic preposterous comedy, the situation revolves around three high school girls from different social segments who can’t stand each other until they group together to seek revenge on the school's mendacious basketball dunking stud, Metcalfe, who dated the three girls at once. They plan to set him up to fall for the new girl, Snow, so she can dump him and break his heart. As soon as the three girls find out they're all dating John Tucker, they end up throwing volleyballs at faces followed by a short female catfight. Scenes hurry up with incompetent conclusions which wind up with silly rage amongst all to demonstrate how the script bails out on every scene like the story’s ending. One scene concludes with female underwear on male basketball players who now have the ability of a five foot vertical leap. No contingency plan serves from anyone and anywhere when the story dries up. The subject tone is very juvenile and callous in nature and there definitely aren't morals to acquire from the immature, though mild, language, puerile attitudes, and various forms of humiliation at Tucker’s expense. Females can retort in violence too just like males in adult action films. Conversely, it's just not the same because girls amuse with evil tricks, slaps, nags, and chocolate pleasures. They are their own fragilities of detest... pretending ineptitude manners. The target audience is disposed similar to the story's conventional adolescent locale and merciless feministic themes. There's no bona fide sense of conflict because the motives are created from teenage feminine anger who solely deal with their first emotions instead processing the mind with a rationale, except for a couple of scenes when they access what traits of John are admirable and construct social agendas. Another tidily move was when John divides the dating and school-greeting time to each one earlier in the film. Though, he is just as inept for not even noticing that each three know within a dozen minutes of the movie that the girls know that he’s been dating each one of them. Snow’s character continues with the narration voice over thoughts on people's backgrounds as Lohan did in Mean Girls, only without the script giving the point of view social functionality and pragmatism. Her acting was solid from her stuttering and edgy expressions. Her makeover, well, there was no makeover for her really. She wasn’t unattractive to begin with so the story was in short of any real principle. John’s younger brother even likes her in advance. She is the unpopular, moving location girl who becomes popular with snobby cohorts. When humiliation happens, the film tries to portray what's happening at school from just plain observations and jerking laughs. One of the girls even documents everything by a digital video camera. The writing had no ideas to finish with so it closes in merely one minute on a stage with cake.

Final Grade: C-/C

A Day at the Races (1937)
Starring Groucho Marx, Chico Marx, Harpo Marx, Allan Jones, Maureen O'Sullivan, Margaret Dumont

Film Prophet's Review...
Incomparable to the paramount Marx brothers’ comedy films, their seventh movie is in a two hour film reaching their peak of success, longer than familiar, and contemptuously with less wisecracking dialogue. Legendary for their sardonic lines and quip ensemble acting, their slapstick is so fast that the viewer can’t take a moment out from their films to laugh and acquaint it without the movie heading into another sarcastic line. The lines said by Groucho are by reverse priority towards a literal context habitually and implicitly of a double meaning… two comprehensions with the second as the comedic retort. A veterinarian, Groucho, poses as a doctor, a race horse owner and his friends struggle to help keep a sanitarium open, but none of this really suits into the comedy. The movie separates itself from earlier Marx Brothers films because of the story concern and the music numbers near the middle of the film, which drags down the extent of humor. This is a review compared to the top four exceptional Marx films, as this is not a great film to start seeing the Marx in movies. To begin, there were hardly any tremendous and classic outrageous routines. It's drolly though not too enjoyable as the others. The comedy and story wasn’t on the same wavelength like in Duck Soup. A big portion of this movie isn't comedy; there’s contrived music play and there’s also a romantic sub-story that interrupts the flow and it infrequently drops in the story. The sequence song singings by Allan Jones are neither funny nor necessary. Chico's piano and harp play can get tedious, but the brothers probably noticed this after the film was produced that it was in excess. Not only did the studio like the music, the camera positions were always in one-half of the setting which were conspicuous. Three of the initial four Marx brothers are present, as Harpo Marx is still the mute character he is, so that just leaves two Marx brothers with dialogue to say. The mute Harpo still has his sneaky tricks to the unaware, blinded man, which are usually due for comedy. Their prime films are when the Marx brothers' characters are pals and know each other from the start. They aren’t running away from anything like usual. They’re placed in inane misconstrues and mistakes in very little scenarios in longer scenes one with a blackface musical number in a movie that ends in a humdrum horse race and a short march song. Margaret Dumont plays her typical female blissful character, the contrary from the Marx’s personality, but her role in this is very trivial than her others. The movie misses the appearance and ignition by Groucho in the opening scenes of the movie, unlike Horse Feathers where he was featured more in the beginning. The comedy doesn't start until Groucho enters the picture… however, once he arrives, the movie is more concern with horses, uptight men, and a drawn out story to open the movie with than the actual Marx brothers’ wacky circumstances. He is better in one on one situations, and somewhat has less zany energy unlike in Monkey Business, and also contains tiresome comebacks… hesitant of even criticizing such a genius there. He and the Marx brothers are nevertheless true verbal comedians of rapid one-liners that hit the mark soundly in differing.

Final Grade: C+/B-

Clerks II (2006)
Starring Brian O'Halloran, Jeff Anderson, Rosario Dawson, Jason Mewes, Kevin Smith

Film Prophet's Review...
Kevin Smith’s Clerks returns a dozen years after the original in this sequel of the same safe selection reprising roles and low budget. The characters have aged, but still contain similar lifestyles, complaints, and conversations about the usual… despite that aging changes people. Dante is rushing into the married life just for progress, his friend Randal lets others succumbed to his logic, and Jay and Silent Bob still hang by the outside wall in front of a vacant lot. Dante and Randall's Quick Stop convenience shop burns down in minuscule flames and sends them on a year at Mooby's, a fictional burger style fast-food place, where the film starts off. This film is in full color with no security camera vision like in the first, when it changes from store to fast food restaurant. Faster than the original, the dead-end trials encompass ethics of hanging out, rebuffing anyone else's interpretation, and to believe in what the self-centered person says through rants about subjects on vulgar sex, marriage, Internet, and trilogies which end up getting forceful with awkward wordy resolutions. The brusque and judgmental faction never quite grew up from their counteract state of livelihood and repressive language, therefore the movie has a resemblance of the original. Most of the dialogue is apathetic and inherent, the type that Smith has become known for from the first one. It depends less on gags and more on character discussions on bitter ordeals and subject issues due for analyzing and scrutinizing chiefly by Randal. Randal pretends to be some astute philosopher, but at most times, he is excessively raunchy. He talks about girl idioms as there ironically are no girls, or chicks, as he describes them to enter the restaurant away from the main cast. They all have offset morals, except that they also have uncertainties and fear on the own topics and life in the future they talk upon. The bluntly sarcasm is light sometimes, but the humor is explicit mainly taking in the dialogue. The cameos were a too obvious, as all were customers. The acting is fair; face expressions and the eye-brow raising lift some quirks. The same actors have played similar parts in other movies during the stretch of twelve years. There’s a hip beating soundtrack that tends to flow out and while the film sometimes can get offensive, it stays on a beam of crudeness and negative cultural conversations. The writing is full of disagreeable prudent construal chatters and talk stirring from ragging adultery hormones. Opinions flicker from awkward comparisons, such as the discussion on human anatomy. As Dawson’s character says, ‘I’m gonna pretend like this conversation never happened.’ The core of the story is depressing, by old flames, but it is distracted with repulsive content and uneasy humor attitudes. It can get upsetting that life is disappointing and miserable; at least that is how the story interprets it for the majority of the film since the characters embrace derogatory ways of describing things.

Final Grade: C+

History of the World: Part I (1981)
Starring Mel Brooks, Gregory Hines, Dom DeLuise, Madeline Kahn, Harvey Korman, Cloris Leachman

Film Prophet's Review...
A parody of several historical and religious events of early epics fits into the bill of jokes waiting for the entitlement. The four main segments are the Dawn of Man, the Roman Empire, the Spanish Inquisition, and the French Revolution, with the Roman Empire having the longest cycle duration in the story. The raucous tacky madcap satire was directed and written by Mel Brooks in his style of direction. His flair on spoofs for this film is on world history throughout different periods of time with several endless character roles. Small cameos feature Hugh Hefner, John Hurt, and Barry Levinson. Orson Welles narrates each segment and the abnormal loose lessons in an hour and a half, ‘even in early man, the need to laugh was vital for emotional survival.’ Taking in the opening chapter from the Space Odyssey with the ape men, the film elongates a few laughing moments for an extended period for over several seconds an act. During this segment, the dumb-witted characters have a lucid sense of humor from their straight and concise gags with arbitrary entrances of ignorance, like the dinosaur. Apparent from that, the production design and sound effects are cheap besides having a costume drama appeal, but that just adds to the amusement. It’s not so much centered on any characters the whole feature length besides the ones Brooks, and his fantastic acting, portrays because they switch and disappear and possibly reappear, so anything that happens to any of them are nonsensical comedy of foreword. There are also stints of the ten or so Commandments and the Last Supper tangled with the Roman Empire and between other set pieces in tandem. When the movie reached the French revolution with the king, it kind of ran over its course somewhat on the same funny material on top of different time periods. The film is swift though, never truly dull, and the writing on wordplay is hilarious and normally consistent presented with alluring sights. The script certainly likes its constant wordplay which frequently implements well into the story’s situations of parodies of antiquity and pop culture absurd references and Brooks is not afraid to say anything. Some pieces have exaggerated representations, such as for Caesar, and the least funny segment was the Spanish inquisition long musical number. There are laughs present across each sequence. Emperor jesting times include masses of verbal double entendres and sexual implications. Figure of speeches with a lines like, ‘you've made some very big decisions, hump or death, and I got a great corkscrew,’ are very common in this clever, but sometimes dirty writing. It tends to count on the words and names of double meanings from the middle of the film and on to comprise of the funny moments.

Final Grade: B-/B

The Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad! (1988)
Starring Leslie Nielsen, George Kennedy, Priscilla Presley, Ricardo Montalban, O.J. Simpson

Film Prophet's Review...
The cynical and incompetent detective Frank Drebin must stop Vincent Ludwig from completing his Queen Elizabeth II of England assassination plan. It’s an international terrorist plot against the U.S., nonetheless impractical. From the creation of Jim Abrahams and the Zuckers, the lampoon and farce movie aims at a television cop series and movies parody. As in the early eighties cop shows, patrolmen would fight crime and look for women in some busy warm tropical weather environment. The crime has to do with the aforesaid tiny plotline and the woman is vacuous and very serenity, though neither area fits the pinnacles of the film. Rather slow parts occur in the comedy film of middling scenes of no hilarity, when Frank Drebin takes moments to rationalize one on one with some one or spends time with the woman who has nothing funny to say or act. When the comedy is on, it is fast-paced, stacked with great instances of spoken puns while spoofing detective clichés and formulaic situations and scenarios. The mock of the genre’s style contains conceptual sight gags from the Middle East to boats to hospitals and to a baseball game. The film features some small parts, such as from Weird Al and OJ Simpson’s character’s misfortune knack as a hospital patient is a hoot. Nielsen is the main character as the inept police detective and does a voiceover narration like a detective in a movie. He is a reckless driver, deadpan, and has a potty humor; an example scene from the bathroom is his level of zaniness. Every character gets time to say something quirky, even the small ones, even if it isn't totally funny. The pathetic criminals don't get much screen time also. Clear and noticeable comedy supplemented by the acting, it is more than one-liners interlaced with more than dialogue. The fist action is goofy and every scene of espionage ready to explode of humor at some point. The film restrains small giggles and short quiet laughs, due to the various accidents such as shooting at his own car on the go with inflated airbags and alarming exaggerations to get to places and get out such as teaching a student driving rage. Frank finishes with being a home plate umpire doing body searches on the players which prizes of some laughter. The laughs are erratically hilarious, though there are not too many clever remarks as expected. The viewers would not so much care about the story of the film because humor itself is more indispensable.

Final Grade: B-

Sweet and Lowdown (1999)
Starring Sean Penn, Samantha Morton, Anthony LaPaglia, Uma Thurman, Gretchen Mol, Brad Garrett

Film Prophet's Review...
Emmet Ray, according to others, was the second greatest jazz guitarist of the thirties. In New York, Ray would play at pubs and the ones close to him would admit that he had other roles besides his musical career, which winded up being his fatal flaws. Directed and written by Woody Allen, the biopic is a mock-biography of a fictional jazz guitarist where Allen and others document his journey throughout the film. They attempt to explain his free-spending, arrogance, and obnoxious tendencies as the story somewhat chronicles the life of the lowdown character. The film has a comparable setting and cinematography from Allen’s Bullets Over Broadway movie. In the company of a character of instrument talent, the biography story from start to end is missing some core struggles, climax, and an acute finish. There is no true antagonist or hard struggles for success in the music career as he was already on top to begin with. There’s no insight to a conflict with others in the business, except his wild expenditures. The music delight is pleasing, but not much develops with basis through the absurdity of Emmet. Sean Penn's portrayal occupies the flamboyant facial expressions during his guitar time with other random banjo players without lyrics, and it is the acting that truly astonishes. The film never really shows him string the instrument, thus more of a facial effect, as the tunes are dubbed by unforeseen musicians. Away from his music, he fails to prioritize and he's reckless to himself and others. He has sudden urges and the audience at times probably doesn’t know what to look for. He drinks with random strangers for a short period of time in the film and then on stage he has drunk, irresponsible antics. Emmet becomes a happy man in is his relationship with a mute and dumb laundress he picks up on the boardwalk in Atlantic City in a superb scene. The scenes following on how is he uncomfortable for a bit with the charming acting from Penn and Morton together are the absolute humorous moments in the movie. When talking to her, he actually complains to himself in confusion and he is free to interpret whatever he wants to while she prolongs to smile. This gave him plenty of opportunity to talk of whatever, but also plenty of dull scenes for the audience before the second half. The story is really indulgent on Emmet’s part. When other characters of greed crop up, the story becomes alienated and bemused. There’s an oddball scenario with hiding in a car during an awkward narration spin in later part of the second half. Though, Morton’s scenes with Penn are indisputably the film's best parts. Hattie, Morton, is devoted to Ray, but he was really shameless in her eyes. Samantha Morton earned an Oscar nomination without even saying a word in the film. In essence and ambience, Morton’s acting was by her eyes, grins, and glances. It was her that made Emmet fairly sane and stable, and he should never let her go. As he can't maintain relationships, Thurman gets more screen time later than Morton. The consistency and material in the storyline is a bit slender like Emmet’s impulsive, stooge personality however. “Emmet is an artist and because he is an artist, he needs no one… he exists in a world all of his own.” The story essentially bestows an indication of how some jazzmen lived in the ragtime era and how one led a tortuous fragmented vivacity devoid of singular attention.

Final Grade: C+

Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)
Starring Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard, Patricia Neal, Buddy Ebsen, Mickey Rooney

Film Prophet's Review...
A socialite New York City playgirl becomes interested in a young struggling author man who has moved into her apartment building. Adapted from Truman Capote's novella, the central premise is categorized as a comedy which is mistaken. The film opens in the most enchanting iconic image in the movie during its poignant music score when Hepburn scrolls and struts along an unoccupied city sidewalk in dawn in her long black dress and sharp figure carrying a long narrow black cigarette while window-shopping, fascinated mostly by jewelry. The simple, carefree wealthy life had no exterior plotting in the unconventional story that was hardly involving. The indulgent dialogue was never really important in this film. The film knows there is no need for lots of dialogue as the characters are portrayed delicate and not sophisticated. They talk about having a sense of purpose, but one doesn't need to follow along the talk either as the cinematography does a fine example of picturing personas. During the second half, it went below mediocre however and rode on steady of blandness. It continued to be unrushed as Hepburn and Peppard resume their lounging and relaxing around talking to each other. In the meantime, some other characters arrive in the social gatherings with drinks then later there is no sign of them. They are the only two characters that matter who are basically the same by means of characteristics in the entire length of the movie. There are estranged family sub-stories in the whimpering second half also. Rooney as a loud, clumsy, and out-of-place bit part Asian was a bit unsetting and offensive. This is a solid version of Hepburn’s signature character without being annoying, as in My Fair Lady. In her prime, she earned her fourth of five career Oscar nominations. The film is mostly a review on her character because the story was merely present to discuss. One can mention her dark big sunglasses, hats, and earrings, as she covers the slow moving film with her facade. This is without an outstanding male lead in this picture in which she usually has. The light-hearted story is not overwhelming with interest. It remains a favorite for Audrey supporters though. There was more of her appeal of style and elegance than a story, romance, or comedy in a fancy lifestyle. Hepburn somehow generates an adequate amount of breeze and charm by presence alone rescuing an easy, mellow storytelling.

Final Grade: C+/B-

Flirting with Disaster (1996)
Starring Ben Stiller, Patricia Arquette, Téa Leoni, Josh Brolin, Alan Alda, Lily Tomlin, Mary Tyler Moore

Film Prophet's Review...
Mel Coplin, Stiller, his wife, Arquette, and baby son seek to find Mel’s biological parents in the country. An adoption agency representative, Leoni, documents the trip as they travel to reunite Mel with his parents while videotaping the experience for her own research. As a marital bliss type of independent film, the frenziedly breakneck characters are concerned with sexual and bisexual opinions and confusions when Stiller and the two women accompanying him meet others who are not funny, but just frustrating to listen to as it is for Stiller to prolong his insanity neurosis acting. Mel has yet to meet his biological parents. There is an outstanding supporting cast to Stiller in the movie. However, their identity in the story is similar to Mel finding his parents, which is diverse and unfulfilled. While the characters can be so strange, there are way too many of them in and out during the story and they were border line exasperating. David O. Russell's road story has a wild imagination of character comedy to dead ends. His cozy direction has uncanny conversations than outrageous occurrences. Stiller is still the quirky kind and his character is attempted to be supported by several funny promising characters who develop into several unlikable, anti-humorous people for over ninety minutes. Elongated scenes between the wrong corresponding parents in the opening third are quite bland and desirable to end quickly. Meetings are carried away by staying in the same resident setting and not leaving to explore the wrong match boring parent pair in this tiresome journey of non-calm people. It stretches it out until it turns into a bunch of random strings that lead to nowhere. Although the cast is large, they are all sorted everywhere and the story is missing an essential male actor to sidekick along the trip. Family related or not, they are mostly passive people. Discomforting moments and mixed troubles are present, but the laughter hardly begins and it isn't reasonably plausible. Some laugh to their own joking comments in vain, but there aren’t any visual gags for the audience to smile or cheer for and it doesn’t help when the movie is vacant of a decent plot. The journey is not exciting to watch as they aren't enjoying themselves either because they keep making many mistakes. Nothing particularly noteworthy is to mention, for example, one can ignore most of the final third of the film as nothing sincerely happens towards the storyline. The whole atmosphere of the film resembles the inconclusive, rapid ending.

Final Grade: C-/C

Adam's Rib (1949)
Starring Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn, Judy Holliday, Tom Ewell, Jean Hagen

Film Prophet's Review...
Directed by George Cukor and written by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn play Adam and Amanda Bonner serving as trial attorneys on opposite gender sides on a case of attempted murder. The female defendant, Holliday, had executed to shoot her uncaring husband, Ewell, and his mistress. Adam argues that the case is open, but Amanda points out that if the defendant were a man, he'd be set free and the woman wouldn't be given fair treatment. Adam defends the prosecution of male, while Amanda defends the accused woman. Clearly anyone who attempts a homicide is unlawful though. The chemistry and interaction by personality between Tracy and Hepburn may just be the best parts of the film. As a projected romantic comedy, there are the daily stresses of their attorney jobs and they go to their apartment and try to maintain a home life. Though, the film should have utilized more humor lines from Tracy's character to Hepburn because those were the shining moments in the film. Meanwhile, the movie surfaces a contemporary marriage at the time with social and marital issues of legality. It is weak cinematically and technically. Sometimes, there are staged scenes with a stationary camera in front of two people for an extended time and it is when the camera is immobile, the dialogue proceeds. The dialogue doesn't occur for over five minutes even when characters are moving on the screen. The movie opens with the sequence of Holliday wandering her husband around until he reaches his destination with another woman. Holliday acts hysterical by the reality of what she just done. The first crisis of the script was that the husband remains alive after several gunshots he took in the chest and wears nothing of healing support afterwards if it didn’t happen. Perhaps a woman is too feeble to slay a man in a movie. The attorneys ask questions to the alive husband and his wife who tried to murder him, but the questioning is not full interesting because it is created by a mediocre screen play that isn't believable just like Holliday’s acting and the audience can forget most of what they say at that time. One scene to note is when Tracy denotes a projection film, ‘the trouble with this picture is that it drags,’ as one could probably allude to the movie itself. It is not a screwball comedy; in fact, it really isn’t much of an intrigued comedy. In addition to the low-key chit chat, when arguing, the married attorneys talk at a louder volume simultaneously while neither of them makes coherent sense by not listening to each other. In the courtroom, they go on to talk about equal rights, but the point is the woman shot her husband several times which is an assault and the major offense issue of murder is let alone. The story and characters tend to ignore that just to showcase the gender issues in which the married attorneys dispute over that weigh little. When they are home, they lay low and look at newspapers that give more information than the script can during the dialogue that should. Bits of genres are combined in one that aren't given enough to last. One moment the married attorneys bicker in the kitchen then the scene later transforms into a singing piano scene that switches the martial couple's subject. It switches from their private life, to social, and then professional while the supporting characters aren’t stimulating to aid the electricity Hepburn and Tracy had during their effort. The script has more friction than the courtroom issues and there is a lack of focus into most insisted backgrounds translated into a below average comedy.

Final Grade: C+

Swingers (1996)
Starring Jon Favreau, Vince Vaughn, Ron Livingston, Patrick Van Horn, Brooke Langton, Heather Graham

Film Prophet's Review...
A comedy-drama about a group of guys in their twenties coping with women and life is set in the Los Angeles cocktail nightlife. Mike, Favreau, is down in a pitfall because he left his girlfriend behind in New York when he came to Los Angeles to seek his comedy acting fortune. He and his best friend, Trent, Vaughn, travel to Vegas for a night to cheer up Mike which just ends up in a losing blackjack scenario. Mike in the early period is nervous and disappointed when it comes to phone calls and messages during his six month breakup the movie passed by. He constantly dwells on his ex-girlfriend and unsuccessfully attempts to rekindle. He is the honest type, but trite not funny with his following one-liners as the movie aims to show low self-esteem. Vaughn’s character as Trent is Mike’s best friend and just the opposite. He acts more offhand around others for a superior interpretation and first impression. He teaches the male audience and offers side rules with meeting women in certain social locations on how to make up conversations, testing vibes, and while listening, but don't really caring, stirring the artificial stories for attention. After a while, the goal is to obtain the digits. The dialogue between the two has the most accurate interpretations about the modern female scene in a movie. The guys talk about close women relationships which aren't technically close. They are not drunk or cocky individuals mingling with the glamorous people. The guys are quite mature, so laid-back, past the mediocre teen cycle and learn from each woman they approach in their swinging lifestyle of nightclubs and house parties. Aware of the script’s surroundings, the guys enjoy their hockey video games and often scenes are provided with a soundtrack of lounge music and underground jazz. Doug Liman's direction fits the tolerant attitude just like the soundtrack as the characters inhabit the culture. The movie really expresses the problems of letting go and starting over fresh. It isn't some kind of noisy party film. The genuine performances make the storyline authentic and painfully true. Vaughn excluding the star charisma is terrific as the witty yet supportive friend. Ron Livingston's performance is almost similar and provides a rewarding monologue to Favreau in his morning apartment about an own life letting go of the past as the future is beautiful. The problem for people is on a first impression, a person can hardly know the other person even while chit-chatting back talking in a social area. The scenes with cocktails are nearly an exposition about universal standards that are enlightening through personal internal conflicts. Every bachelor can relate to the movie on some rejuvenated level.

Final Grade: B/B+

Waiting for Guffman (1997)
Starring Christopher Guest, Eugene Levy, Fred Willard, Catherine O'Hara, Larry Miller, Parker Posey

Film Prophet's Review...
As a mockumentary by Christopher Guest and co-written by Eugene Levy, the parody film takes place in fictional town of Blaine, Missouri and its community theater. Citizens prepare a play show celebrating the one-hundred fifty anniversary of their city. The opening dozen or so minutes tries to educate the audience with the town's history, although not that it really matters as none of it can be recollected from mind. Filming by a hand camera, a person talks to a person who is positioned to the right of the camera unseen as the person talking explains deviant past situations of people they knew, often losing the point of stories which results in small amounts of humor. When the story gets underway, the small town folk puts together a play in hopes that a Broadway producer named Guffman will come and see it on time. Christopher Guest plays the lead as Corky St. Claire who is the homosexual director of the play and yearns to get into Broadway productions. He has also had previous success of stage plays in town; unfortunately, the cast of a small local ensemble is not musically gifted. The film does allow the performers to encompass some deadpan hilarity. However, some of the areas in the movie are very plain. Nevertheless the amount of comedy is frequently lofty, such as during the talent auditions for town parts. The comedy is unbalanced between every scene, but it exists, and distends out the yarn a bit when it's comic. The characters are customarily moderate and modest, not eccentric, and the plot is rather simple and basic, so there is not a lot to explain. Due to a little written script, there is some improvisation during this fake documentary as they went along like an amateur theatrical play. There’s basically four acts in the film; the opening exposition of the town council, auditions, rehearsals, and the actual play performance itself. There are moments of aversion, then other times it almost punctuates tedium comedy to check if the audience is still alert, but the experience of the film is not fully satisfying. The performers seek to act moldy and it is part of the film's comedy recipe that is undercooked, barely.

Final Grade: C/C+

A Fish Called Wanda (1988)
Starring Kevin Kline, Jamie Lee Curtis, John Cleese, Michael Palin, Maria Aitken

Film Prophet's Review...
Charles Crichton directs a very black comedy and farce in which is unreal and distressing to the viewer as much as it is to Archie, the lawyer who gets trapped in this awkward design. Four thieves, two Americans and two Englishmen, search for a stolen supply of diamonds they faulted during a heist in London. The name Wanda refers to a pet fish and the name of Jamie Lee Curtis' character. In the broad burlesque and improbable situations of consolation, it’s a satire based on other satire films. The tasteless gags and the out of the blue fictitious romantic angles attempts at a combination of jesting, vulgarity, and insincere comedy… all in which justly adds up from the story’s hapless victims by a scheming and manipulating woman. Instead of investing time with morals and messages in a comical manner, the film does completely the opposite. The situations of comic exaggerations are not alluring. One reason is that the characters are anti-heroes since they are criminals demonstrating an offensive range and versatility of profanity at British and American stereotypes. There aren’t many differences between these people from two cultures as they both share the same trait of greed, a rich irony. In the exposition, the four meet all together and discover each other's infirmity, such as stuttering. There aren't any laughs in the first opening sequences and it takes a while till any amusing lines or scenarios happen. The first humor comes towards a mixed up scenario when the lawyer’s dumbfound wife arrives in her house with her husband explaining and covering up the ineptness while Lee Curtis’ character, Wanda, hides. Wanda is such an intricate person, aggravating, and putting on so many different acts with everyone. She has an integral role in every male character and is manipulative and quite unlikable. She is desperately trying to figure out where the loot is by seducing her partner’s lawyer who she suspects knows where to find the diamonds. When their eccentricity disembarks, it is more delightful, or rather painful, humor than loud laughs. The humor is between character interaction and tension than individual gags, which is odd due to these characters who are egotistical, conniving, liars, and ravenous following in slander, slurs, and apologies. Everybody was just really troubling to each other and the script, which was somewhat suitably written, bewilders itself when it mistakes the viewer whenever one is trying to figure out when the characters are telling the truth. Clipping nails and dead skins, undressing during sexual antics, while another two flirt in a simultaneous scene who have an affair is not funny but gross, like the French fry torment. The often fake romantic ties are cunning but not laughable. The sole humor is centered when they ploy their way out of things, surprising one another, by the looks on their faces. The movie is full of humiliation and lying. The comedy scenes are when they conceal and suppress something phony baffled in a discomforting moment. They’re very uncomfortable instants for them and the audience to sit through and watch just as much as Ken was trying to say the hotel name to Archie in the worst stutter ever heard. ‘Don't call me stupid; oh you English are so superior aren't you?’

Final Grade: C/C-

Airplane! (1980)
Starring Robert Hays, Julie Hagerty, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Lloyd Bridges, Peter Graves, Leslie Nielsen

Film Prophet's Review...
A spoof on the Airport disaster movies and other notable vogue films, when the crew of the airplane is sickened by a food virus, the passengers depend on an ex-war pilot, Hays, who must overcome his fears when he is the only one able to land the plane for a safe landing. The wide array of passengers represents peculiar madcap characters who seem to take every word for its literal meaning, resulting in a series of double entendres. There are comedy strings in the cockpit, and even out of the plane back at the airport base. One-liners are in a straightforward manner not deliberately to be humorous but just acute in correctness. The most famous line however from the film is… I am serious, and don’t call me Shirley. Most of the film's lines are like this and it's where some of the comedy is supplied. The humor is hilarious and ungainly, while the acting is always sub-par from a second-rate cast, especially from Julie Hagerty's opening sequences, or maybe that is how it was intended to be. The whole romance area had more scenes that there probably should be in flashback, and it was the least part added to comedy though... at the least yet still funny. From puns, slapstick, and causality, such as the repeated suicide attempts during the ex-war pilot’s flashback monologues to passengers aboard. The picture is ridiculously funny from a crisis storyline at its nucleus, a plot structure in which is nearly identical to others that are satirized. It opens with an airplane under some dark clouds in the sky with the Jaws theme song. Plainly, every scene contains a hoax or a sight gag, such as the automatic pilot, or a double meaning somewhere. Misconceptions, comedy of errors, and mistakes, such as one in the early going when a guy is directing air-landing traffic, make up the off beam interpretations. Something funny manages to slip in scenes with no boundaries at every moment by a yardstick through a startling spin on reality. There are camera shots of omitted or extra items in the frames and then disappear to regularity, which gives a viewer other reasons to watch it a second time. For the scenes of comedy, which is about every one, the screenplay is firm for humor every second changing it up with something new sliding by, by audio or visual, which would keep the viewer intact. The film is a non-stop bombardment of effective word plays that will have a viewer giggling in many ways from its arbitrary general silliness. Crazy antics and sightings in the background, coming in from all angles, as this motion picture contains numerous clever gags and spoofs, as mostly they are puns. For instance, smoking or non-smoking, jive talk with subtitles, drinking problems, mayday, and get some pictures. The longest laugh of bursting out loud is when a lady with a guitar sings a song to a sick young girl in a bed. Artificially, there is huge range of variety of jokes. The film offers many laughs for many senses of humor. A pilot asks abiding questions to a young boy regarding homosexuality innuendoes. Nielson is the doctor on board, and is more deadpan comedy than folly. For a film being so silly it sure is very clever at coming up with comedy of all arrays and rational with convincing humor. The genius of this film is that the comedy exists in multiple places and at multiple levels. A viewer may laugh too much when one can't possibly stop it. Once the sequences finds the great laugh, it broadens and holds the scene longer for more satirical mixtures of hilarious aviation.

Final Grade: B+

The Grapes of Wrath (1940)
Starring Henry Fonda, Jane Darwell, John Carradine, Charley Grapewin, John Qualen, Grant Mitchell

Film Prophet's Review...
Set in the Great Depression, a family of sharecroppers travels through hardships of migrant workers moving West from their Oklahoma homeland that was kept in the family for generations and were forced off. Tom, Fonda, is decreed to return to the prison from which he was paroled. Director John Ford takes a different style from his usual take on Westerns, nevertheless completing the satisfaction of a landmark American story telling and movie making adapted from John Steinbeck's novel that won the Pulitzer Prize in the same year the film was made. The movie won Oscars for best director and best actress. Ford’s shots are effective capturing the land in ruins and the hush state of brute disheartening emotions. Morality to the sympathy is how Ford keeps the complex yet exact tale authentic. The astoundingly dark lighting is in low levels, and there are a lot of night scenes and shots of deserted areas. There is more black color than white and grey in the photography and it is evident that black represents negative and perilous material, contrasting with the images of beauty from the film. The lighting was so dim that the characters often look like silhouettes in their own presence, sometimes supported by a small candlelight. Shadows and shades portray malevolence; cops are pictured with the darkest ambiance with no faces, blacked out, from the poor lighting because they are all same by means of hostile to the under-class of America. Of the film's most powerful examples of man's inhumanity to man are a roadblock by an angry mob and the ones set against guards and man. The cops and guards are the most pitiable and contemptuous positions because they are one-sided, completely ignorant, ill-mannered of comprehending issues, biased, and bossing around injustice where the regular person is powerless. Holding a flashlight, one who does not abide by a guard is embarrassed to not follow an order from a superior role. Cops are not there to protect people; they are just looking to raid and extremely enforcing law in which they make up on their own. As Tom says, ‘You aimin' to tell me the fellas that are runnin' the camp are just fellas that are campin' here… no cops?’ Part of the evil in the story is the greed of the banking industry, police, and really anyone who orders around the unemployed groups. Job employment is brutally scare, the weather is inclement, agricultural settings are severe, and the guards are violent… it is the struggle against company power over the common folk in society's fabric desolation time period. It was bad enough by the lack of food and conditions expressing even more from no help of government officials. The faces of hunger by visualizing in the haunting uncover struggles with pains, exhaustion of boredom. John Ford's direction is seamless, not needing entertainment quarrelling scenes, but at that time and true to its setting, entertainment was inadequate like food. He never really adds any comedy or music to heighten the film, except the pure joy of being together with the Red River Valley tune. There are some really tormenting scenes that show the misery of poverty and exploitation by the class in power. They say kind things and the people during these times had every reason to grumble and be grumpy. The stark photography by Gregg Toland underlines the bleakness of existence. It was what Ford's next epic movie, How Green Was My Valley, wanted to be, but couldn't… the misery of the working man in a conventional manner for the audience. The film opens on a vacant land, no jobs occupying any parts of it. There are roads but no cars driving along them in daylight. Enormous large amounts of spaces in the foggy and windy atmosphere are a component with the communication isolation. Fonda's character is uncompromising and hardnosed, sets out on his own, sometimes independent and a wandering nomad like the rest who are in sync with the oppression of farmers. ‘I lost the spirit. I got nothin' to preach about no more, that's all. I ain't so sure of things.’ He meets an ex-preacher who baptized him and joins the family on the way while the mother holds the family intact in the worst times. "There's somethin' goin' on out there in the West and I'd like to try and learn what it is.” Farmers were once a priority in the social class structure, as this story reveals the fading and evaporation of the previously-prestige farming occupations. The dialogue is a very essential denomination coming from a book with great writing towards the terse story of illustrative shots and flashback moments of how it all fell apart due to officials, humans. The three most important qualities to life then are family, food, and land. Choices are made whether to stay with family or defend lost land even though one is hopelessly beaten by armed watchmen. The country was in need for social reform. “I'll be all around in the dark. I'll be ever where, wherever you can look…. Wherever there's a cop beatin' up a guy, I'll be there.”

Final Grade: A-

What About Bob? (1991)
Starring Bill Murray, Richard Dreyfuss, Julie Hagerty, Kathryn Erbe, Charlie Korsmo

Film Prophet's Review...
“Is this some radical new therapy?” The story follows Bob, Murray, a neurotic man who panics when he is told his therapist, Dreyfuss, is going on vacation, so he decides to follow him. The therapist is in fact a successful, but self indulgent, psychiatrist with a book coming out, as Good Morning America is going to interview him to talk about it at his vacation house. The very affable Bob ends up friends with the doctor’s wife, daughter, and young son; it slowly drives the doctor outlandish, divergent from the start with Bob. Throughout the movie, Bob is giddy, never once angry even when he comes across his claustrophobic nerves in tight spaces and germs on knobs of sorts from annoying phobias. He is contagious to the family who gives him hospitality because they can see Bob is overall harmless. One can assume Bob has attention-deficit disorder, but in all facets, he is just that to the doctor with his enduring catching problems. Bob’s state of objective is mostly impracticable. He's either infuriating to the doctor because he wants to be away with him, or loud and warm around other people. Miles Goodman composes the quirky, irregular music score to match Bob’s hindrance which steadily moves to the doctor. The laughter is coherent and deviates from the aggravation story and its part of what makes most comedies truly funny. Nearly all comical aspects fall into the roles of Murray and Dreyfuss, and as well the interaction between the two, where the low self esteem alters. The movie is fairly funny, though not an all-time Bill Murray great. There are quality comedy performances supporting the script with visual and physical acts than just a bunch of goofy lines depending on one-liners. Bob’s hesitations appear to diminish the more he is with the family and he is gentle, contrasting to the unlucky, controlling doctor who is afraid of the lowest thing he shouldn’t be, while the film balances the pacing so it is not frenetic or slow. Bob during the story creates a strong bond, more than the doctor can expect. Murray’s oblivious anxiety character comprises of foolish antics to get the doctor’s attention in cyclical format. They are embarrassing moments but Bob doesn't care; ‘Bob, your behavior is completely inappropriate.’ The aforementioned layout continues to be uniform… Bob reminds himself of the baby steps he is told, where ever he heads to he is also carrying a goldfish around with him, the doctor keeps saying how he is on vacation, Bob uses a tissue to grip handles, and the son is trying to dive. The light-hearted family comedy examines a look of contemporary psychology between a patient cherishing with a retentive doctor’s family.

Final Grade: B-/C+

Life of Brian (1979)
Starring Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Michael Palin

Film Prophet's Review...
From the Monty Python crew, the film satirizes the life of Christ in biblical times just like in the Holy Grail lampooned King Arthur in ancient times. Three wise men deliver their offerings to the misguided infant Brian and his baffled mother, portrayed by a male performer. Grown up in civilization and mistaken later on, Brian once a regular civilian pretends to be a preacher to the attention of small crowds following and depending on him. Brian is meant to be the parallel life of Christ only in the fact living in the same setting. He is well confused with point of views and transvestism themes thrown at him. There is not much effort into the production or costumes despite the designed acts and period piece ensuing around a ragged costume drama appeal. Python’s surreal, cross-dressing comedy has multiple roles for one performer in a quaint tone and a light manner… not like it really matters since both genders basically wore alike wardrobes then. It's very standard Python: wacky, crazy, dark sense humor, blasphemous language for comedy purposes, silly things that men do, mocking of the idiocy of man, often dim lighting, and a parody of past films. However, several problems assort an entertaining comedy from its lackluster piercing. The film does not have as many laughing moments one would expect, but just cracking slight smiles. The acting is fine and precise to small body movements or twitches on passing scene transitions. It’s just that the writing is full of dialogue than visual acts. Their skits attempt to generate laughs on a loose framework of nearly the whole thing written. The dialogue comprises of lengthy exchange of words between multiple characters ridiculing each other. Sometimes they are communicating in far distances from the camera. There is a fair amount of crude and irrelevant silliness in disorderly situations. Characters haggle one another in an irritating falsetto, especially Brian's mother. The majority of the film's content is not too humorous and inhabits way too immensely on elongated, panicky dialogue between dumb characters with high-pitched voices coming from men who all admit they are irrational. The story is composed by a bunch of small skits where most can be ignored and be immune to its humor. They clash disagreements all over the place from weak, irresolute individuals. Lines from the script are, Speak to us master, Go away, how should we go away. The crowds speaking in unison in responses parts get repetitive and they usually end up sounding silly and irritate Brian further. Around the hour mark, there is an abundance of frontal nudity, more than laughing matter. This is just after Brian somehow ends up with a pair of revolting creatures inside a spaceship that flies above. The content is as unbelievable as it is happening to Brian who is always baffled like the film's plot order sequence collapsing from the pathetic and feeble nervousness of Brian himself. That is what Monty Python comedies are all about; madcap peripheral nature.

Final Grade: C+/C

Raising Arizona (1987)
Starring Nicolas Cage, Holly Hunter, John Goodman, William Forsythe, Frances McDormand

Film Prophet's Review...
H.I. McDonnough, Cage, who has a proclivity for robbing convenience stores, and police woman Edwina, Hunter, marry, however they discover they are unable to bear a child, and also adopt one. Desperate for a baby to begin a family, the trailer home pair decides to steal, as in kidnap, one of the quintuplets of an Arizona furniture tycoon. The McDonnoughs try to keep their crime a secret, while friends and others look to draw on the baby for their own purposes. There's also a motorcycle bounty hunter who wants to find the kid as well. The Coen brothers usually don't write characters with big personalities and zany energy, but this is before that time of the dark writing. The family orientated film’s main matter is pandemonium in a hurry with mayhem at every corner of the road. The speedy story doesn't contain hilarious outright moments, rather when it settles, the funny moments rise when it's about the sap than the story’s plots. This helps make the story unpredictable, but not too slow because then there is neither. Two convicts escape out of prison and visit McDonnough, serving as a subplot. Goodman gives an utmost performance with long screams and child implication dialogue. The story features frail people in fragile situations, such one in an on going car chase involving several missed gun shots and dogs on the loose. There are food products and grocery store items lying around somewhere frequently around the people, as the Huggies product comes to mind first. Accurate or not, Arizona culture aspects appear- convenience stores, lots of food, deserts, prison system, rich tycoon, and a lethargic police unit. The characters are very unconventional, sometimes wild and frenetic. The men grow long thick sideburns, and wear hair gel and beater shirts. Cage’s narration voiceover opens the exposition that concerns the story process over comedy with two very excited characters about to live together with scenes that last for no more than twenty seconds while Cage continues to talk more over a voiceover than the sum of current voices as it takes ten minutes till the title screen. The Coens know how to write a comedy surrounding a child and irresponsible adults in humorous manners with a decent screenplay. The camera spins from peculiar stances, positioning fast and hectic like its characters and certitudes. Due to their choices, mass disorder plays out with humor ploys to cover truth that the child is actually kidnapped, or stolen. The style isn’t absurdity, but that of cravings and reluctant premature life lessons. Nearly all characters of idiosyncrasy have traits that are intrinsically childish, which makes the infant look like the composed adult in the emerging comedy situations.

Final Grade: C+/B-

The Jerk (1979)
Starring Steve Martin, Bernadette Peters, Catlin Adams, M. Emmet Walsh, Bill Macy, Mabel King

Film Prophet's Review...
An uncomplicated adult, Martin, has been raised as a member of a large poor black family in the South and it has never occurred to him that he might be adopted since he is the only white person out of place in the family. From that plotline, it is safe to say there aren’t loads of racial jokes, in fact, there aren’t any to recall. For the opening minutes, he emulates the life styles of the people he resides with, although this changes within five minutes of the film when his mother breaks the news. He leaves the crib and goes on a series of adventures as different workers where he has never been placed in any jobs before and has little common knowledge. Though, he is welcoming and there are times where he is taken advantage of because of his dim-witted inner self, but not entirely. His manners are kind and he gathers experiences with new women throughout the story. Laughing is usually an automatic move especially to silly characters and idioms, which sometimes puts the viewer at an elevated class standing. As the movie proceeds, Martin’s character is closer to be that somebody, but just with lots of money and possessions. Nevertheless, the pleasantry is present surrounding Martin incessantly. The viewer’s laughs come from by being amused by Martin's performance and the writing for the film that provides the supporting characters to supplement his humor. In a typical comedy, the writing rarely concerns the plot which is usually minor or less to the epigrams and lines. The story moves and evolves with the comedy, which carries out nearly every minute. Performances are weighed heavily and the only familiar personality is Steve Martin. He is so natural, and worthy of value for the sheer comedy. Martin is in just about every scene and there are a variety of slapstick moments and memorable situations managing to keep this as much of an entertaining film as possible. Martin has entertaining one liners acting on individual humor because he is a character without long chats, appropriately written. There are silly gags where he is unable to figure it all out, showing his dense side, such with the motorcycle stunt artist. The majority of these moments are quite humorous by the level of pitch tone Martin delivers the lines at. The times where he is a listener to every word of a valued lesson are impending amusements for the viewer. The most hilarious situation is during his course with the phone book - Things are going to start happening to me now – when a random snipe hunter comes at him during his gas pumping occupation. It’s a fun movie about a man who doesn't really know how the real world works and yet achieves, like the movie as a foundation for many prevailing comedies.

Final Grade: B

Harold and Maude (1971)
Starring Bud Cort, Ruth Gordon, Vivian Pickles, Charles Tyner, Tom Skerritt

Film Prophet's Review...
Director Hal Ashby's eccentric and morbid black cult comedy is about an oddball connection between a death-obsessed nineteen year old named Harold, Cort, and an unlikely seventy-nine year old widow named Maude, Gordon. Including an enormous age difference and neither striking in appearance, they are outcasts who meet at a funeral sharing the same desire of attending church funerals. To think about it, every friend was once a stranger. A stranger at funerals is strange enough still the film conveys Harold's perspective with his countless numerous scenes surrounding him in which he gives a blank expression. One would suppose Harold would have tons of lines to say though his dialogue is partial and he is usually slow to speak of something to say. His aura is perpetual from his quietness and dull look when someone else is speaking to him. The lines he says other than to Maude are literal remarks responding from another line. Maude probably speaks over eighty percent of the film's dialogue when she hangs out with Harold. Harold is death and Maude is life during the story. He is a young male with absurd and whimsical mock suicide problems though an old woman who is a quirky and excited wild driver probably has a few of her own as well. She is loquacious with humor and defiance transpiring in her values on wisdom with her flower metaphors and her philosophy in living each day to the fullest. Several occasions Harold attempts his faking suicides for laughs, or maybe just pleasure. He is the only one who understands himself and his sense of humor is only funny to himself, yet he doesn’t laugh in any scene. The humor is this movie is very light mostly during the macabre performances from Harold. The film introduces his character first before Maude as it starts out odd and repellent with his couple of pretending staged attempts to upset people such as his mother that appear valid and any viewer watching it would hesitate to perceive. The morbid humor is rather quaintly tense in eerie moments. For instance, pulling out a gun and not knowing what Harold would do with it or if the gun is an actual one happens all during his mother's questionnaire. The mother arranges dates and Harold just delivers one of his fake death stunts, which are practically real looking, to distaste the woman. It's a counter culture film boundless like its two primary characters that satires the army and the early seventies period where young adults were isolated and condescending. The original and unique film featuring a simple story also has outstanding music provided by Cat Stevens, one in particular titled, If You Want to Sing Out, Sing Out. Harold and Maude’s relationship is tender and sensitive, more so like a powerful friendship early on. During the course, Maude goes in opposition to regulations in a free spirit resistant way and adjusts Harold's point of view on life and death from his expressionless, pale condition while appreciating all living things.

Final Grade: B-/C+

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)
Starring Gene Hackman, Gwyneth Paltrow, Ben Stiller, Luke Wilson, Owen Wilson, Bill Murray

Film Prophet's Review...
In Wes Anderson's comedy-drama, Royal Tenenbaum, Hackman, and his wife had three child prodigies before they separated. In their early teens, Chas, Stiller, was a real estate trader, Richie, Luke Wilson, was a junior tennis champion, and Margot, Paltrow, received a big money grant for her ninth grade play. All the young Tenenbaums genius was erased by two decades of failure to melancholy and recovery. Most of the psychological damage was by and large considered to be their father's fault. The grown main cast takes within seven minutes of the movie at this part. Anjelica Huston as the wife and Danny Glover are also part of the popular long list of cast names. The poignant multigenerational tale follows the family's sudden reunion by the hedonism Royal Tenenbaum who comes back into their lives to make up for loss time by telling them he has six weeks to live. Accompanying the film is the ideal soundtrack fitting in the film’s eccentricities in a devastatingly human sincerest form of exaltation. As for the comedy, there are small hilarious situations and visual gags. They aren't funny people and the script doesn't necessarily give them jokes to say on purpose. The film is more sophisticated and tidy than Rushmore, yet Anderson's style of underestimating all elements of the human condition surround the comedy. He distances the audience from the characters for the first hour, as they are to each other during that time, disinterested in existence with dad as they are. Some scenes are effective; some aren't, though uniformly divided. It slacks in an abiding plot with everyone involved during the first half of the film because the grown-up offspring are yet to connect to the estranged father. During this time, Alec Baldwin’s voiceover narration for Royal is the only position of mind to enlarge current developments. The performers are introduced with understated blank facial expressions in an emotionless state of conflicting emotions inside. These are mostly from every character while the narrative continues to explain occurrences scene by scene or technically a chapter by chapter as the film lies out. They are downright lazy and inattentive showing the emptiness of each flat character. The story manages to be a solid display for each of its actors sharing the story and uniting. Generally, Stiller and the Wilson brothers are the largely engaging just by their acting. The entire cast’s acting withholds by charisma in pitiful, and then savoring roles by means of family ties. Stiller’s temper dissatisfaction with his elder dying dad creates chuckling entertainment. There is really no little yelling or no profanity too. Everyone has his or her own single issue and they all sit glum, some with a stubborn attitude. The camera features them sitting or standing directly parallel and center in front of the camera keeping distance so there is room of the surrounding environment. The second half entraps an improved follow up transformation. There are delicately revealing moments that infrequently go for laughs, though there are some that lighten and brighten up the frame of mind. A self-seeking redemption can turn out to have wonderful mélange that’s deviously clever. They are confused and alienated… and the audience rarely understands them in sync, which is a reason why the viewer continues to watch. The ease of difficulty, fulfilling in the unfulfilling kind, insincerity without irony, and reacquainting of family is how distinctive this film’s story is. The connections it endeavors for the characters are small, but sizeable - smoking, widow lives, affairs, or advice. Indecisively as the characters are directed towards Royal's many quips is where they shine through their exterior blankness into gently affecting momentum that brings out the great performances from Wes Anderson’s cast in nature.

Final Grade: B+

Blazing Saddles (1974)
Starring Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder, Slim Pickens, Harvey Korman, Mel Brooks, Madeline Kahn

Film Prophet's Review...
Directed by Mel Brooks, the scathing spoof on the Hollywood westerns sorts out racism and prejudice assumptions. When the sheriff of a town is murdered, a shrewd convict, Bart, Little, is appointed the first black sheriff of the all-white town by the iniquity Hedley Lamarr, Korman, who plans this will chase the townspeople from their homes to seize the valuable land and increase his Presidential prospects. Sheriff Bart soon gets the message that he wasn’t meant to succeed. “Excuse me while I whip this out.” Gathering the help of a composed town drunk, Wilder, formerly known the Waco Kid, who sides up with Bart. A railroad is coming, and the town-folks’ bias, and the corrupt politician and cowboys’ bad intentions probably will offend some people, but it gives an entitlement to laugh at society's insular intolerance. It is a parody of the Western film genre with satire on discrimination jaunted by gross-out humor in Mel Brooks’ first commercial success. The new black sheriff, stunning by selection, turns out to be smarter than expected. Richard Pryor, who one can picture in the role of Bart, was a part writer for this script. Every perspective is fair to put in context and slur it in language with sharp testy dialogue. The lines are offensive deliberately in a foul tone and a social satire on derogatory epithets. The second half and on shows the idiocy of prejudice in all its forms where the movie was once incredibly raunchy, setting a racial attitude that would be in modern profanity terms and one who would be hesitant to speak of, but it is evident that the writers were just joking. The racial humor pans out a little after Bart becomes sheriff. The jokes are half racial and half clichés of the Western genre especially means of most standard characters, spinning such a character as a sex-obsessed Governor. The jokes are both funny and inappropriate, for example, “Hey! Where are the white women at,” which turns out to be the most hilarious line in the movie. In a somewhat humiliating manner, the cruelty of mess in the movie’s plot strives on situational humor and the story isn't really important, noted by its outrageous brawl ending. The jokes never excessively stretch out certain funny moments. The most famous toilet humor scene is the night's campfire eating beans. The longest, maybe most avoidable scene, was the extensive seductive saloon singer number. There is no dominant personality in the story even with Wilder in the picture. He remains cunning and cool just like his comedy acting, as his debut in story as the Waco Kid is about twenty to thirty minutes within the motion picture. He is so calm yet so funny. An example of his moderately funny bits is his quick hands when the camera never shows his split-timing of his gun. The humor and simple pace, the slightest of conflicts, is slowly steady like most Westerns.

Final Grade: B

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (2006)
Starring Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley, Jack Davenport, Bill Nighy, Naomie Harris

Film Prophet's Review...
Captain Jack Sparrow, Depp, is back in a supernatural intriguing ghost pirate fascination. He owes a debt to the legendary Davey Jones, ruler of the ocean depths and captain of the ghostly Flying Dutchman. As Will Turner, Bloom, and Elizabeth Swann, Knightley, find themselves propelled into Jack's misadventures after a closed wedding, their problems grow while wrenching for a key and a safe. The facial computer images are an enormous distraction to stare at even when one doesn’t want to see. One can’t help with the picture so close-up and locked on to a dead pirate face with vigorous aquatic life forms on it to check out all those hideous designs. The artists go a long way to imagine models for the dead repulsing pirates. Meanwhile, the story has several little scenarios coming at all directions and the film is often too busy that the viewer doesn’t know where to exactly look at anymore… so frequently the eye falls for the composition of the villains. The makeup, set production, and costumes are certainly astonishing for every piece in the film. For example, one has cheeks puffed and composed of disgusting odd images and another has a consuming beard of tentacles which is uneasily freakish. The viewer would keep watching because it's neat to look at including with the choreographed action, though the movie is slightly less compelling than the original. Detail and attention are provided for almost everything, except the plot. The sequel loses most of the original’s fun and funny side by complicating the viewer’s mind. A very complex tale typically is assigned with specifications, but this one is quite different. In general, the movie features an utterly different story nevertheless it takes tacky opening moments to re-introduce the main set of characters and to catch up on previous knowledge that is still hazy when the film ends. The story has a lot, but it is frequently obscure especially when it attempts to resolve situations. Much like the characters in the story, their decisions too are perplexing. The characters are split up and it is murky to tell the whereabouts of each one and how they came to a certain spot. At times, they are brought together again from various points in the story as the viewers would have no clue how they ended up located back on a ship, bizarre island, another ship, a rowing boat, or another ship. The section at the start of the film does not fit anywhere, primarily Sparrow’s attitudes during an awkward culture island visit full of ignorant indigenous people. Jack Sparrow's hyper eccentricity and subtle fidgets are amusing, as well as the sword and gun action he partakes in, but his character is too incontrollable and foiled. Cages are made of human bones and several ship crews constantly trounce against a sea monster are other forms to gross out and captivate the viewer’s attention in this camp pirate story.

Final Grade: C+/B-

Fargo (1996)
Starring William H. Macy, Frances McDormand, Steve Buscemi, Peter Stormare, Harve Presnell

Film Prophet's Review...
An incompetent car salesman, Macy, in Minneapolis has gotten himself into debt and hires paying two thugs, Buscemi and Stormare, to kidnap his wife, so his father-in-law who is a rich man in the small town would pay off an eighty thousand ransom, split in half. The desperate car salesman's scheme collapses in snowy rural Minnesota, drawing in a pregnant police chief, McDormand, into her first homicide investigation. She is unaware that several homicides are connected to the kidnapping as the thugs are more violent and irrepressible than the salesman counted on. Nominated for seven Oscars with two wins, brothers Joel and Ethan Coen are the directors and writers of the film. The neo-noir film is relatively shorter than expected for a Coen brothers film who usually like to lengthen films with futile scenes and bland characters a la Miller Crossing. This movie is on opposite ends of it by entertainment and artistic quality. Convincing as it is, the film is an evolving crime drama with snow on the ground that is just special in general discrete from Hollywood cornerstones. It combines humor with suspense and there are interesting personalities, a lesson the Coens learned from their terrible movie in ninety. Some have fear, or are naive, mostly, they are courteous. Two quirky and twisted hit men try to manage a blindfolded kidnapped woman and the car salesman’s zany plans end up turning out of control with humorous qualities so it is not all solemn morality. The two men tease her and try to keep her alive without telling her of her husband’s scheme. Gun violence by and large takes place when the timid thug, Stormare, wants no witnesses so he hunts to execute them all, one in a stylish car chase of headlights. In the meantime, the car salesman fibs to his worrying son and still at once maintains the orchestrated kidnapping of his own wife for his father in law's ransom money. It’s a story that's genuinely convincing, yet has a wildly unpredictable narrative in the hands of those two hit men. An opening title screen states this is a true story, however, no such incidents ever occurred… the movie plays out moderately believable though. The film does an excellent work on the portrait of a society with cold temperatures in Minnesota by means of their accents, big winter coats, forlorn adult bars, weather, fast foods, smorgasbord restaurants, and breakfast. The darkness of the malevolence characters diverges with the cold, white, and pristine wilderness setting of the film’s landscape and cinematography. Like the cinematography, the acting and music selection are summit pieces to this film. Every performance is fantastic. Frances McDormand’s late arrival as the lead role as the pregnant police chief is just like the pacing of the film… unhurried, but even, appropriate for the exact rhythm Fargo shines throughout the movie. The pace is unique and refreshing capturing subtle suspense moments and light comedy. The cops, also known here as rangers, aren't totally involved as one can imagine for a crime film as it is merely one person with her dim-witted partner to solve the crime. She interrogates with questions in the small town while the car salesman didn’t expect the rangers involvement, all within the hilarious investigation. The simple plot devours minor complications as nothing goes right and people end up getting killed. There are noticeable character flaws to the audience that are relevant to the plot of the movie and to the plot of the kidnapping which evokes a spree of panic and amusingly warped set pieces.

Final Grade: A-/B+

Niagara (1953)
Starring Marilyn Monroe, Joseph Cotten, Max Showalter, Jean Peters, Richard Allan

Film Prophet's Review...
Two couples meet during their honeymoons at a Niagara Falls motel. Rose Loomis, Monroe, conspires with Ted Patrick, Allan, to murder her husband, George, Cotten, but it does not go according to design. The other couple spies on George, and he does too the other way around. The majority of the movie consists of one half of a couple spying on the other half of the couple. No eerie music is played, no talk is exchanged, and one is often followed in excess. Monroe's first starring role would become unusual in her career. Absent from a comedy and a dumb blonde depiction, this role is a femme fatale type, erratic and self-destructive. Her husband is essentially shallow and hardly notices her. The communication between the couple leaves the viewer also isolated to them. Two highlights of the film are seeing the sweeping footage of the Niagara Falls scenery, and the moments where Marilyn wears her stunning bright red evening dress. Those two are images, exterior to substance, and the film remains hollow like all characters. The film directly opens to the mist of the falls and its spray with a rainbow. Rose has arranged for her husband's murder plan from the moment her face first appears inside her motel … no preamble by any means to the story. This movie is an example when a writer and director fail to equivalent validity with two perennial movie stars. An obscure asserted dramatic thriller with frail film noir basics is shot in Technicolor which hurt the overall picture quality from an authentic black and white film noir motion picture. The suspense side of the story does not reach the distance to befit a destructive romance thriller. There is a fine difference between pacing a movie slow and suspenseful… this movie is pure slow; not suspense or the combination of both. At a troubling leisurely pace, the story doesn’t develop a motive of any character early on or cause of the oblivious and conspicuous looks and stays vague. The movie's own actual plot hazily begins until Rose opens up, which is never because when she hears church bells, it goes awkward for her. The interaction between the Loomis couple doesn't happen at all and they separated by distance or quietness so one can just assume something is not right. Almost every single line in the movie between each other was false and too playful. The other couple arrives completely on the contrary, and eventually get involved involuntary in mischief with the Loomis couple. The boring dialogue, that is when the characters have something to say instead of just following each other around, inexactly helps. They walk without written lines and when there are, they materialize as insignificant and bland to a very perverse plot. The finale is on a small boat with two people who just stare obliquely at each other, just waiting for them to exchange some sort of dialogue for ten plus minutes. All of this is vague to the audience because the story is badly written with lousy acting, as some of it has to do with the hasty script. The script somehow even makes Cotten's character uncharismatic which is unusual to see, so his talent doesn’t really contribute. The writing imprecisely offers the characters with much to say to each other at any times and most of the time, the Niagara Falls is the real picture to watch.

Final Grade: C-/C

Bananas (1971)
Starring Woody Allen, Louise Lasser, Carlos Montalbán, Howard Cosell

Film Prophet's Review...
Fielding Mellish, Allen, a consumer products tester, becomes infatuated with a woman who is a political activist towards South America. He attends demonstrations and tries in ways to convince her that he isn’t self-indulgent. In what really is Woody Allen’s first major motion picture that he wrote, directed, and starred in, an anxiety-ridden New Yorker, the quintessential Woody character, becomes a South American rebel leader who has two days of American college education that puts him in that office. The movie is really an early immature phase of Woody’s filmography. Most of the content is complete nonfigurative drivel with inept sexual encounters, impulsive attitudes, and politically incorrect matter, but extremely zany. The satirical comedy depicts military and political events in Central America passing the third of the film. There is a slight mention of bananas, though no bananas visually appear anywhere, which the word is a pun itself. When the gags are greater than the story, there would be no social, realistic, or motivating abiding rate to the story. True to the previous line, the oddball plot is very loose, completely contrived and bizarre but that just adds to the low-budget fun. The scripted lines are just as ludicrous to listen to as to follow the story. In the story, Fielding Mellish is found in numerous class structure positions and a viewer won’t need to comprehend it wholly. The viewer would customarily watch the very clumsy physical comedy by Allen that is quite funny, such scenes especially when Woody is not brawny fitting, apparent on the subway when wordless Sylvester Stallone is around in a cameo role and on field training with the guerrilla rebels. When no one else is talking or no one is around and it is just Woody and his view of current agendas mounts on occasions. They are normally embarrassing, such as the magazine rack scene. The best parts of the comedy take over without dialogue and it is edited more like a silent film without any words with just a music score sounding like a squeaking horn. The absurd areas of the story, for instance backing into cars, all merges into Fielding’s gawky state. A review of the movie would have to go into the funny gags since that’s the principal objective, so to mention two: The moment where Allen gets off an airplane and a language interpreter is there de-code his English to English in America, and the jury passing around an active hit in a courtroom are legitimately comical. The comedy excels to the audience when it is delivered just by Woody, so the dialogue is not entirely funny during the political conversations with leaders but only when odd things occur due to clumsiness and gaucheness. Allen's direction is suitably done for the type of short comedy even when he turns off the audible and allows physical and visual humor to appeal cinematic in the farcical situations.

Final Grade: B-

Deconstructing Harry (1997)
Starring Woody Allen, Elisabeth Shue, Kirstie Alley, Billy Crystal, Judy Davis, Demi Moore, Stanley Tucci

Film Prophet's Review...
Harry Block, Allen, just elapsed middle age and has never really matured. He is a novelist with writer’s block and hasn’t written the latest word for his new book. He has had three wives and he is on his way to a college that expelled him as an undergraduate to receive a life achievement award. In the meantime, Harry's latest girlfriend has chosen to marry his best friend while another buddy is having heart problems. Black comedies typically consider serious acts such as death, aside from the movie really being pompous on blasphemy. Block is an alcoholic who has few friends and can't stay devoted to one woman. His previous books were about his relationships with his three ex-wives and neither one of them liked it. So, each ex-wife is vulgar and offensive to him and it is obvious that these females aren’t like the ones in other Woody Allen films who were fascinated with him in present state. Allen is on top of his usual neurotic self, though he has a voice narration that’s grumbling. Unable to cope with females who depend on him, he hires prostitutes for his new chapter. Having troubles with his peers and losing the capability to continue writing, they jointly resolve together gradually by the gain of surrounding inspiration when he isn’t entirely isolated. All the time, however, his bad habits and nerves arise. His book is reflected through the people he knows and some elude literally out of focus. A large amount are grumpy and negative with jaded lives that effect close ones, though they still cuss every person apiece. The majority of these problems are most likely common but towards among a pessimistic audience. People can never agree and they use their big tempers to get along which doesn’t work. The fiction Block creates exaggerates the truth putting fictional or dead characters into play or just blurring the person out of remembrance, some almost surreal moments. Director and writer Allen was influenced from foreign language fifty films, consequently the jump cuts and death figure appear. The jump-cut editing style, for instance the psychologist scene, is presumably to imply the fragmented mind and incomplete story of Block. Some scenes are pure fiction or self-analysis with his peers. Other parts are ultra censored sexual. These are the people he knows and for the most part, it is ill at ease to a point but quite humorous because it is irregular to see any two people groaning together to fellatio in the middle of the day with elders around. Block didn't change in the movie; he just found other miserable people to put in his story without his ex-wives who have irritating problems to listen to, like him. The content is not ration to a plot but to the characters in which helps create characters in a story from a large cast who have just miscellaneous small part time roles popping up fighting over little affairs. Julia Louise Dreyfuss, Richard Benjamin, Paul Giamatti, Tobey Maguire, and Mariel Hemingway are also apart of this cast. Totally unsighted is Robin Williams, wherever he was, as he was so undistinguished that not one scene from him comes to memory. Every single self-indulgent one yells and complains more than Block, which is bad for a top Woody script. Block is probably Woody’s most tactless character… there is no dignity or redeeming qualities about him or from the people around him in a loathsome overabundance of profanity.

Final Grade: C/C+

This Is Spinal Tap (1984)
Starring Rob Reiner, Michael McKean, Christopher Guest, Harry Shearer, Tony Hendra

Film Prophet's Review...
Directed by Rob Reiner, a filmmaker makes a spoof documentary about a once-famous, almost forgotten British metal band returning to the United States for a concert tour. The term is most noted as mockumentaries. Largely, the documentary candidly follows a rock group heading towards a small crisis of selling and other sorts of slight dilemmas and they go through a selection of new drummers and new tour production adjustments. Their appearance is shirtless, long hair, and loud guitars on stage. The male rock vocals are distinctive, the music is pivotal and the lyrics are not necessary profound while the bits of song performances are separated by the scenes and momentum in the movie. The film places space to allow them to rock out their songs on stages during the film. However, there was very little thrust by means of a plot, well, there is no plot even though it is a fictional documentary. Much of the film was improvised without scripted lines. It is a loose documentary on spontaneity which is more difficult to shape the direction of each scene. The camera is handy to gather the caress of a documentary. It isn't vertically wild and fast with quick edits going over useless parts to show rock music is a prompt scene. The filmmaker takes a seat with the band to discuss their overall timeline which goes in sequence with the movie's upcoming scene after it is talked about. The documenter, acted by Rob Reiner, comprehends their way of life and attitudes on rock pressures. The actors are quite plausible in these band roles; still the imaginary of the band group is bounded when it shouldn't since there is no script that is not sufficient enough. The two front men get most of the splendor and they aren’t condemnable men with acts of drugs, crime, and booze. The guys in the band aren’t buffoons either. When asked questions, they modestly provide a genuine answer about their rock culture life without being quaint about it. They are never once cocky and they’re realistic in their positions. Accordingly, they don’t make fools out of themselves most of the time or exclaim jokes to anyone else. The metal detector is probably the one memorable gag, but the film doesn’t exactly do justice to the comedy component for an audience to laugh out loud. They aren't determining to be humorous nor is there anything to really laugh about. Regardless of their talent level display, there isn’t enough material in the movie to be funny, but the material is never too absurd to believe. Nevertheless, the viewers can somewhat enjoy the band’s happenings during the film and appreciate more of what a band goes through to put on a superb show for the crowd. Stage and sound malfunctions, limousine conversations with manager, covers, jazz experiments, bookings, press, critics, hotels, small venues and signings… one driver called the band that they are living in a fad. The content is rather easygoing and regular for a music scene. They aren’t the emblematic rock stars; they have ordinary social parties and concerns and disagreements about how to settle small matters like any other person. Although there are nit-picketing times that are hypothetically droll like the one about the tiny sandwiches in the dressing room. The band also is inclined to be ingenious with the set production and the result is as mediocre to them as it is to the audience.

Final Grade: B-

Superman Returns (2006)
Starring Brandon Routh, Kate Bosworth, Kevin Spacey, James Marsden, Parker Posey, Frank Langella

Film Prophet's Review...
Audiences have been exceedingly fascinated by the original comic book superhero era of adventure movies with large budgets. When comics to read seem to be childlike and outdated presently, people will enjoy the superhero blasting superpowers in the field of screen. Nowadays, the adaptation of comics to film is crucial and decisive. Practically, the viewer does not need to have followed the Christopher Reeve movies, paper comic books, and television series to figure out who and what is Superman all about. However, the film obligates to entail a viewer to endure for almost three hours that comes with slight flaws in the middle of the canonical visual effects. Following a mysterious absence of five years, the Man of Steel comes back to Earth. An old enemy, Lex Luther, plots to depict him against his kryptonite weakness while rising up new land. Superman also known as Clark Kent deals with the realization that Lois Lane has moved on with her life. Superman embarks a journey of redemption that takes him on the boarders of the Atlantic Ocean all the way to outer space. Director Bryan Singer from the first two X-Men films settles for an extensive combination of romance and fantasy. The more the unbelievable the digital effects are though, the more time the story proceeds taking to fit in the movie. Singer operates most of the movie with a leisurely pacing of long scenes that aren't really dynamic and when the sound is completely off. Kal Penn, who was Kumar in that one comedy film, participates in Luther's squad and for some reason, he never gets to say a line as he was in most parts Lex was in and did a few memorable tests. The dizzy Kitty in Lex’s corner was terribly annoying in particular when she was in the driver's seat of an unstoppable moving vehicle. Kevin Spacey as Lex Luther is convincing just by his acting alone and he definitely held the best scenes. He made Lex menacing without the script giving him an astonishing spectacle ride summiting with Superman. The amount of screen time dedicated between Superman and Lois is way more than the couple of minutes Superman and Lex look at each other. For Lois Lane, she is torn between two men, or actually three counting Clark and Superman as separate people in alter-egos. There are plenty shots of Bosworth but she seems a bit of a miscast someway. The most fun anyone in the story has is when it flashbacks to Clark Kent grasping the full scale of his abilities as a young male leaping sky high across corn fields. Whenever a scene would begin in a hostile disaster to end in what looks like a tragedy, the viewer should know no matter what that any projected victim will be rescued in time for a safe landing… by Superman. A few examples are bullets, drowning, and crashing, most fears any human has. Superman has super-strength, super-hearing, X-ray vision, and super hearing to use those towards life-saving obstacles for no price but stability and candid press. When anyone lives under two complicated separate identities and personalities, one is bound to lie to each party familiar with only one side, except Superman doesn’t. Then again, there is bad romantic dialogue because it was depressing to hear that neither side was truly happy about their personal status with each other. Superman didn't really get much to say unless it was to Lois after he got done finishing his pestering and super hearing her conversations. Consequences aren't brought up either to find out the truth between Lois and Superman. There are irresolute crime motives, including the one with a rapid missile fire on top of a building. The time period and setting was a bit unclear too because by the style of clothes and atypical cars, there were still mobile cell phones, above all ones with snapshot taking which wasn’t featured in the original films because that technology didn't exist then. From a weak flow in the beginning of not being able to tell what is in present time, Superman's five year absence is explained in a couple sentences and it is no longer patent to see or understand of what exactly happened in that time. As the film finishes after almost three hours, it proves the writers offer nothing really new to the Superman series. Nevertheless, most moments emerge unbelievable in the movie, so different from Christopher Nolan’s film. Some may say the best action sequence was the startling, but underwhelming airplane survival. However, the best scene didn’t need visual effects. Superman receiving a dreadful pounding on the ground from Lex's squad as he was helpless against kryptonite fit enormously in the instantaneous construction of Lex's intended new land. This sequence was an elongated, but clever instance of continuing a starting point on Lex Luther's yacht to an ending point of troubling action pieces.

Final Grade: B/B-

Click (2006)
Starring Adam Sandler, Kate Beckinsale, Christopher Walken, David Hasselhoff, Sean Astin, Jennifer Coolidge

Film Prophet's Review...
A remote is designed for laziness and handiness to flip things to preference. Whoever is in control of the power wins the rights of inclination. Whenever the remote is incontrollable, or let's say on auto-pilot, one gets very upset. While the concept of the universal remote is fun in a foreseeable format for a while, the lesson flourishes to an adult who learns what it means to be a family man. The story centers on an architect approaching a promotion with little time for his family who discovers a universal remote control at Bed, Bath, and Beyond that allows him to use functions such as fast forwarding and rewinding to the concentrated point in life. He takes the remote, and in general, living life, for granted and he gets his work done at the expense of family time. The first half he preferred to take it easy so he zipped through the annoying and slow moments and people in life that would just end him back on an architecture project due for work. Hasselhoff plays Sandler's defiant sexually harassing boss in the movie and he was actually funny. Beckinsale as the wife is an ideal female lead for this story. Walken who gave him the remote appears vaporous to tutor him on it during the film. Former supporting cast mates in other Sandler films are in the cast, such as Astin, Walken, and Henry Winkler, including references of the O'Doyle family in Billy Madison. Some of the humor is a bit crude for a bit. The children use profanity, the dog humps a stuffed toy duck, and Sandler begins his usual physical humor jumping over gates at a high volume of speech while another character says an amusing remark slightly afterwards… all in which is humorous. The Japanese and Spanish ethnicities and language translation parts are the funniest moments in the movie. As life passes by before his very own eyes, the remote doesn’t pause the whole world... it’s just to his to area of concern. In the midst of eliminating the absolute life experience, it is affirming to his appeasement and more pleasing to his character and style than anyone else in the picture since he is the only one who sees and controls, therefore limiting time with others. The people are unaware in sight of the capability of the remote in which he carries with him all day long. He fast forwards family events than work, the opposite of what most people would do. Family is essentially important than speeding past it. He visits happy moments in the past, but confronts pain in a complete spin of happiness that surprises himself of the capabilities so he looks to the remote to solve his problems, however, he can’t when he gets mystified in the imminent lifeline. The second part of the film surrounds an abundant speedy drama result of an entire life memory to death. During this time, the versatile movie evens out the timing of casual jokes and still somehow produces sympathy during the laughing through tears in the nearly seamless concluding elapses of the story. It is the most effective Adam Sandler film of blend of comedy and grieving drama and it was everything Spanglish tried to be. The second half deepens the focus and values on families. The apparent theme established through the few couple scenes is present time over work and money.

Final Grade: B/B+

The Sea Inside (2004)
Starring Javier Bardem, Belén Rueda, Lola Dueñas, Mabel Rivera, Celso Bugallo

Film Prophet's Review...
“The sensation of peace is infinite.” Spanish director Alejandro Amenábar directs a true story surrounding the main showcase of the film, Javier Bardem, the performance of euthanasia to end his life with no dignity for nearly thirty years. Bardem is Ramón, a Galician fisherman in northwest of Spain left paralyzed in a sea after a diving accident. To Ramón, a life devoid of dignity is a life not worth living. A female lawyer supports his cause and a local woman wants to convince him that life is worth living. He lives without feeling below the neck and lives bedridden which is unentertaining for him and the audience to watch. Various people, such as his family, women, an irrelevant priest, and the government, won't let him when he chooses to die in his opening speech from his bed in the film. The film won the Oscar for foreign language film. The journey to death can be tricky. There is no happiness in communicating from what really is a death bed to close ones relaxed but uncomfortable and frustrated. It gives the viewer to position closer to his point of view. For almost the entire film, it is just as cheerless to watch on screen. Everyone in the supporting cast calls each other stubborn so that would make them all truly tenacious. They debate moral points of death for two hours with the dignity issue and it quickly becomes depressing. Then they encourage seeing the hope and the beauty that will never come because he simply refused to and gave up hope. Often the aging Bardem gives smiles and grins, the only sensation due to his physical limitations. There aren’t any fun-packed scenes and the enjoyment of life is kept to a minimal. They just slacken and look at each other from one position. A film with a straightforward, slow tempo is unfulfilling designed only to grab one's affection without a necessary bright adventure during the film. It goes back to conversations about wanting to die. His wish not considered serious due to his stated mental illness. The cinematography may just be the best part of the film, even though the building he lives in his flawed because apparently the characters like carrying a wheelchair up and down a set of stairs instead of having a more handicapped accessible place with an elevator. Flashbacks happen through a narration of what happened in his diving accident and other areas of his young life. This includes a perspective of opinions and thoughts from other characters revolving the issue, which defines details and facts to the foreground story. During the story, he attempts to consume the women into loving him and not to be a burden to them who have to take care of him so that a woman in love would carry out his only wish of death. The women are also inspired to accomplish things they never thought possible and embody the crippled life. Suicide is an action of a coward and it is selfish. He lies down, listens to opera or classical music on the radio, and fantasizes when no person is around to talk to him and imagines escaping out a window, but can't do it. The bulk of the exceedingly long film takes place in his room and fails to add an act of anything resembling humanity than just dry debates and bleakness dogmatism. He spends most of the movie under the sheets with conflict of views, which doesn’t necessarily extend the protagonist as an antagonist doesn't exist because it is all in social problems. It’s a maudlin film trapped on a man's courage to go on including the subject of assisted suicide.

Final Grade: C+

Bullets Over Broadway (1994)
Starring John Cusack, Chazz Palminteri, Dianne Wiest, Jennifer Tilly, Mary-Louise Parker, Jack Warden

Film Prophet's Review...
Set in the roaring twenties in Manhattan, this comedy of errors revolves around gangsters’ interaction with a show theater, primarily through the relationship between a playwright and a mobster. Each performer in the play has a different idea as to what to do with the story. The playwright has problems funding for his latest play on top. He agrees with a gangster to fund the play as long as the gangster's young girlfriend can play the lead role. The girl is loud and obnoxious and bad at acting. The original written story not based on a Broadway play was nominated for seven Academy Awards including original screenplay and Wiest’s win for supporting actress. It’s a comedy period piece with a mix of personifications in the twenties without any funny jokes. It begins like a fast pacing, splendid film about gangsters mingling in the theater scene of the past. The archetypes of the twenties are all there: gangsters, playwrights, showgirls, thespians, hit men, and agents. Most of those roles are the entertainment circle of modern mainstream part by part. The exposition contains a series of the primary characters whining in a high tone of voice to agents or people close to them because nothing is right for them. The gangster on the other side of the room would talk in an aggressive violent manner which gives Cusack, the idealistic neurotic typical character in a Woody Allen movie, just a big headache in the middle of the room, much like the viewer watching. Cusack’s central character as the playwright didn't get much to say in a scene of a group of characters because his self-esteem wasn't as big as the others. The large cast has so little room to display their flairs as the film jumps around from rehearsal changes on stage to homes of women with more nagging while the only time Cusack gets to address his opinion is during his one-line voice-over narrations such as, ‘and then there was the time when…’ The women’s mannerisms were too vibrant and energized at all times of the day shouting frequently. As a movie that is partly about a play, there was not a lot of singing or performing and the men just put up with the annoying female characters. The still camera with no cuts in one long scene made it appear similar to acting from a stage play however. The grating characters would want to revise the script that wasn't accepted by the performers. Through this, tedious conversations occur while no events in change of course happen that will allow a viewer close to any of the characters. With all of them, there is not really one steady enticing bond to allure one in as well. Though, the movie is not nearly funny compared to other Woody films since there weren't any true jokes, but just oddball lines. The plot was tamed because it nags with lines like, ‘you shut up and read.’ There are speckled amusements in the script though little to recall because most of the scenes happen on a routine basis and doesn't leave out of three sets: a home, stage, and a park. A viewer can't laugh at people unless one really enjoys the character. The unreality of it all means a viewer can never really empathize with any character as it gets increasingly ridiculous from arbitrary gun shots.

Final Grade: C+/B-

Tokyo Story (1953)
Starring Chishu Ryu, Chieko Higashiyama, Setsuko Hara, Haruko Sugimura, Sô Yamamura, Kuniko Miyake

Film Prophet's Review...
Directed by Japanese filmmaker Yasujiro Ozu, when an aging couple visits their adulthood children in the suburbs of Tokyo from the country, they are interested in seeing the whole family before it's too late. “I wasn't in time. I was afraid of that. Forgive my delay.” Ozu's film is serene, unhurried, and pensive, syndicating a sense of concealed anguish. Expressing frailties are not at large found in the film because families in general are should be sympathetic and kind. A cessation of frustration would distinguish signs of weaknesses and concerns, as one alcohol influenced scene points out. Ozu lets the deceptively tranquil tone occur in front the unmoving camera at low camera angles in order to explore family relations with sensitivity and humanity. The camera shots are typically at sitting level and they are always still. There are no rapid cuts or action; it is the unhurried look at the human nature and flaws. The music score is wonderful, and so is the imagery of factory chimneys and trains outside of the home. The dialogue is fairly top-notch; it isn't tedious nor fully entertaining, just ordinary and well written to be paced. The most anticipated times are when it is poetic and lyrical that adds to the stylish experience. ‘To lose your children is hard, but living with them isn't always easy, either.’ A short sentence like that is bittersweet as the dialogue in the last scene is. The film starts out regular with conventional conversations of welcoming and acquainting family, later conveying the details of great hostility and everyday humdrum life in its realism. They enjoy agreeableness, but anytime an odd thing comes up, for instance, one will say, let's change the subject and cheer up. Sometimes people need alone time and isolation from everything, but not too often especially when there is little to do. It is hard to let a man show himself suffering a bit. Just as close as family can be, in some cases, they are just extended as acquaintances moreover. Once in a while, a family will organize to get together to meet and eat and sit down. In the typical Japanese way, the interactions are simple, intricate, and short. The adults are mostly featured in groups of more than three talking to each other with polite manners and saying sorry to trouble you type of lines. They are too kind and sincere to each other. A viewer probably wouldn’t really recall the names of the characters, as it was more of age, appearance, and their biological status in the family. As in the two boys who are in the lowest level of current generation, the boys aren't blatantly cold. They are the ones who bicker the most though to their mother, but they are just wrapped up in their own lives of growing up in a world of industrialization and rising skyscrapers while learning the English language. The character that brings the bliss equally to all is their daughter-in-law, widowed in the war, and is pleased to see the grandparents and everyone together. She remains to be positive and happy no matter what the grandmother says about old age compared to young, and later pronounces the most famous line in the film - Isn't life disappointing. The young boys sat on chairs next to a desk, though they are never featured with their parents sitting together eating. The older children, their parents, their grand-parents sit around on personal rugs on the floor occupying their selves with folded paper fans. Scenes like those are filmed by low camera angles, only a few feet above the ground representing the Japan point of view for an intimate, familial atmosphere. Everything starts base up… the floor, the camera positions, and the children's behavior. The two young boys are grounded, literally. The story is mostly shot inside shelter or one home and when they are on screen in the opening hour, the adults just think they are cute and smile not to be as mad as possible. The film at a lengthy point centers on the grandparents together as two and the two boys are completely out of the picture. There is a superb scene where the grandmother squats down with her grandchild picking flowers not really paying attention to her when she asks what him what he’ll be when he grows up and if she’ll be there to see it, yearning that he turns out to be a commendable individual as a family member. Certain traditions are left behind because sadly people grow older; time is slow or fast depending on the reflection when children flow away from their parents. Regardless of the Japan setting, the film owns a universal connection to associate with any engaged viewer. No one has a leading role in the film, much like a composed family. Everything is so regular and candid that the viewer can be drawn to their mundane everyday lives, slight gestures of kindness, and daily tasks. There are no external threats or dysfunctions. It is a world that no longer resembles the traditionalist way of growing up, moving away, and that unspeakable expectation of each other. The acceptance of family is mutual and the study of the emotional resonance can happen in any family.

Final Grade: B+/A-

The African Queen (1951)
Starring Humphrey Bogart, Katharine Hepburn, Robert Morley, Peter Bull

Film Prophet's Review...
In director John Huston’s fifth collaboration with Humphrey Bogart, Bogart wins his only Oscar in a role where he is in charge of his own small steamboat titled The African Queen during the start of the first world war to transport supplies to villages in East Africa. After a German army burns down a Congo tribal village and when the Reverend dies, Charlie, Bogart, agrees to take the Reverend’s sister, Rose, Hepburn, back to civilization while taking on the Germans at the same time. Humphrey Bogart and Katherine Hepburn are frequently lauded as the greatest movie stars of all-time. They join together slightly next to the peak of their acting careers in their first color film as well as for Huston. Hepburn plays an assured woman struggling to maintain her dignity in a hot climate on a boat. Bogart’s character in contrary is a scruffy drinker living by ferrying along the Congo River on a dirty steamboat. For quite some time on the boat, he uses lightweight comedy comments, but most importantly, he's polite no matter what she says or does. Many times in the film when one character speaks, Huston chooses to focus on the other person who is listening to let the audience know what that other character's reaction is without the use of dialogue. They go from loathing one another to liking after near-death experiences. The film combines affection, why don't you questions, isolation, and adventure together. During the film the two stars stayed on the boat without going on land in the humid Africa, noticing the sweat their foreheads on how hot it is even though they wore layers of clothing. Along the way, they encounter tropical obstacles on the river. The two were not as argumentative as one can expect however. There is a moment where she tells him to leave the little shelter cover when it rains when they are sleeping, but he rarely despises her to get cruel. They bathe in the water on separate sides of the boat, he repairs a propeller back together and makes torpedoes, and then somehow one ends up in one another's arms relaxing and content that they got past a wild rapid. Much of the story however seems unrealistic. They are the only white people residing in an African village as all Africans leave or go else where when their village gets burned down. It is hardly believable as the characters are uninteresting sometimes and they're the only two humans on screen for a long extent. Both of their performances were fair enough to be situated in gauche surroundings. The shots at Africa differing with the sets the film uses are both fabricated looking. Puzzling to the viewer and sensitive to fluctuate primary colors, it is out of all proportion. In the weakest area of the film, the orchestra generated music was way too loud and exaggerated at times. The sounds also accompany village noises and African shrieks while the music blares up behind. There is a small war plot that goes on off-screen with the rivalry between the British and Germans and their colonial interests in Central Africa, but it really isn't important. Since he had the courtesy of bringing her along, without that part, there wouldn't be anything to watch for and the film repeats exact story that is told in the first couple of scenes when she gets on the boat and has no knowledge of how to operate a travel across a river. The movie by large is quite too undemanding to retain interest because it limps in motivation, momentum, and sharp dialogue to tune in more. The movie is really about the relationship between Rose and Louie than about the journey whilst arguing to each other with their own social and gender perspectives.

Final Grade: B-