Welcome to FilmProphet.com
> Online Since August 2003!

Film Prophet's Movie Reviews Page 4

 

Young Frankenstein (1974)
Starring Gene Wilder, Marty Feldman, Teri Garr, Peter Boyle, Cloris Leachman, Madeline Kahn

Film Prophet's Review...
The grandson of Victor Frankenstein is a science professor who has an unlikable reputation because of his grandfather's past odd work, then he inherits his grandfather's castle in Transylvania where not only a hunchback Igor and a pretty lab assistant is found, the old lab equipment is also there. It is when he enters the private working area, he becomes absorbed and penetrated to repeat his grandfather's famous experiment to recreate the Monster. "Stand back for the love of god he has a rotten brain!" Director Mel Brooks makes a lot of hilarious spoofs and Film Prophet goes on the record that this movie is his best film as it is not a fast or slow slapstick comedy. He uses raw outlines as most of the jokes cover a specific range, sparkling impressions with great sets that optimize open space, and hides that there is more to the story which builds a tremendous stride during the movement of the story. In a parody of all Frankenstein movies, it balances the comedy, seriousness, and the sheer menacing tone. The atmosphere of the movie is totally fantastic because it was shot entirely in a crisp black and white cinematography and the performers, including Gene Hackman in a minor role, made it feel as though it was really filmed in the forties. The acting was sincerely genuine at its finest where they established a real comedy making spoofs on its precedents. A comedy with stupendous acting can be done, a phrase that is rare to be seen today. The movie did not have nor need fast action, deaths, impossible stunts, unordinary and outrageous acts, or reprisal traits to entertain and it still grabs the viewer's interest. It's just the few characters who have development time as the story is concentrated around them. Gene Wilder, who owns among the top comedic performances here as Doctor Frederick Frankenstein, shows his versatility in his dialogue and it was incredible. He brought out the best the movie had to offer and he complemented every scene he appeared in while the audience will believe in his performance and the story. Sometimes the funny moments won't make the viewers laugh all the time, but the acting sells it at the point where it is laughable and it stills holds the aftermath carefully. There are clean and amusing lines that work on a visual level too because of the acting. "I thought I told you never to interrupt me when I'm working!" Every time Igor speaks to the doctor, it is bound to be a humorous quote for comedy relief. The movie improves on a consistent stage minus the first and final few minutes as the dialogue is packed with immense quotes - Ixnay on the ottenray - as the movie is beyond amazement.

Final Grade: A-/B+

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (2005)
Starring Martin Freeman, Sam Rockwell, Mos Def, Zooey Deschanel

Film Prophet's Review...
Book one from the six book series states that humans are the third most intelligent species and dolphins are second as they've been trying to communicate to humans about the destruction of Earth, according to the story. It is undisclosed who is the most intelligent until the end. The movie starts where dolphins begin singing utterly bad like they have it all figured out and this creates a strange atmosphere... in which this is the only steady aspect of the movie. Humans are insignificant to other species on Earth is hard to comprehend at this age as not one casting member shined as this is done on purpose because man is just average and knows little about the galaxy. However, the jabber can be expected by the chaotic beginning where bulldozers arrive at Arthur's house and the next thing he is vaporized, leading to a journey attended to be hilarious in an imaginative, but unresponsive comedy. The filmmaking is absurd with the bizarre CGI creatures and other visual animations to stun the human characters, but the real problem is the facts from the book come through a narration only and this experience Arthur faces in the galaxy is really nothing. Knowledge comes in a computed sounding voice with boring diagrams in an animated slide show, but since the information is presented like that, it would be better off to actually read the book instead. Anytime the narration starts again with its 'suddenly out of all probability' tagline bestows to aggravate the audience. The movie didn't present enough entertainment to the audience and it seemed all the unrealistic, supernatural elements were too much too handle that revolved into no contentment, especially if one is not familiar with the novels, but in a movie perspective, it aimed at the wrong target. The message is boring and non-educational where things are not always as they seem while afterwards, one hasn't learned a thing. The film doesn't send any real data of understanding that will trigger off as an afterthought, a technique that serves in great movies. The rest of the movie contains non-sense sequences that aren't important while Director Garh Jennings also had many scenes that went no where and made no sense out of the story with any continuity in the plot. The action is sparse, the trailer was terrible, Arthur is dimwitted in the movie, and at odd times, there were immature and uninteresting mild funny gags that never resulted in a giggle. Zooey Deschanel and John Malkovich were the lone bright spots. Adapted novels don't always work on the big screen as fans of the series know it could have been better portrayed. Some things are hard to follow while the story easily becomes edgy and disconnected where it loses the complete message.

Final Grade: C-

Spartacus (1960)
Starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Charles Laughton, Peter Ustinov, Tony Curtis

Film Prophet's Review...
Spartacus, Douglas, a fearless, heroic, and poised icon in movie story telling, is a slave gladiator inspired by his love for a beautiful slave woman where he leads a rebellion of slaves against the Roman Empire. Spartacus has a dream of freedom, which is pitted through his slave army where he rises above degradation of love, leadership, and high ideals over the ruler Marcus Crassus, Olivier. During the story, Spartacus is sold to a wealthy head of the gladiator school who is given a female companion, Simmons and he is trained and inspires the other slaves to cheerless triumph. The movie establishes strong human spirit for freedom in a way that few movies do these days and this hero tale is among the greatest original historical epics, instead of the sold out Gladiator movie, where Douglas easily beats out Crowe as the better lead actor in the valiant role. Terrific casting and couldn't have been better choices for the names above... all with powerful voices and a great appearance from John Dall, who lived a short admirable stint at acting. The story builds from the bottom and climbs up with advertently exciting scenes that pinpoint and excel in everything the film wants to accomplish. The fight scenes are realistic and come at the right amount of duration, length, and action that aren't over the top, too many, and unnecessary. The details on the characters such as the armies, slaves, and the Roman Republic are coherent... the slaves have grueling tiresome work, brutalized and uneducated, and are required to fight to their death in a small arena for enjoyment in front of the free wealthy people, like Julius Caesar. The slaves assist and care for fellow slaves, and get whip for in in return from their master and in the end comes a magnificent, moving event in the movie. The genius story telling directed by Stanley Kubrick has stunning music and sound and creates a magical composition of an inspiring film. Kubrick's timing and pace according to the screenplay, written with some outstanding quotes, sustain and hold a protagonist along the storyline and the scenes with Douglas on screen are always the best to watch. There are strange surroundings or situations where slaves don't know how to act. For example, they undergo fierce training, also educational to the audience. In one scene, two are pulled from a group of four slaves in a dark cavern go out to fight to death for a small, private viewing and inside the cavern is Spartacus and a black fellow, each quiet and what sounds off is only the noise of the fight, and eventually they get their turn to battle where Spartacus has his signature tiny sword against his opponent's pitchfork, a clear disadvantage for Spartacus, and this scene turns out to be a surprising, stellar ending... truly amazing. The masters know their slaves and attributes as this is relevant where they try to sell them where two women behind gates are expressed by a master who are selling them off. The acting contains strong arguments and momentum, something Oliver Stone's Alexander completely fell out of. "Are you afraid to die Spartacus? - No more than I was to be born." However, within the three hours of film come some extended, extra scenes near the three-quarter mark, such as the marches and lectures before the huge battle, still Spartacus changes the fate of his people. "All men lose when they die... free men die when they lose the pleasure of life, a slave loses his pain, death is the only freedom a slave knows... that's why we'll win."

Final Grade: A-/A

The Interpreter (2005)
Starring Nicole Kidman, Sean Penn, Catherine Keener, George Harris

Film Prophet's Review...
Anytime a new thriller comes out these days, critics praise that it's the most thrilling movie of the year on its commercial as if they've never seen a movie before, except those quotes are lies, just like the movie's characters in this story do, because not every thrilling genre type of movie is the best of the year. In fact, Film Prophet says this is a non-thrilling movie that proves to be dull with no thrills, making it the least likely movie to thrill of the year. Kidman's character as the interpreter is insecure, and the movie makes sure she is occasionally frightened. Basically, her character throughout the whole movie either lies or hides things and this makes a very unconvincing script. In many scenes, a dreadful, unintelligent political talk begins and then it leads to an unnecessary family question from no where such as do you have a brother... maybe. Her character is getting too prevalent lately in recent movies where she is alone, very clueless as people try to help her gather more information. The story goes as deception unfolds inside the United Nations, where an agent, Penn, is assigned to protect an interpreter, Kidman, who overhears an assassination plot, targeted by an African dictator, a poor old man as the villain, a bad choice. The movie never shows any scene relevant to her actually knowing information about it, which would confuse the audience totally to wonder why people are trying to harm her and this carries a vague questionable initiative that floats around with a horrible conclusion. The movie also had a poor exposition where the first scene hurried too fast and then the story settles and calms down way too slow into extended scenes of middling talks between Kidman and Penn as the first twenty minutes are full of bad one-liner questions and answers, followed by various characters and sub-stories as well that make no sense as it leaves the viewer out of the movie too... immediately off the bat without a clear purpose of a story that one won't really focus or care any longer. There were one too many conversations about details in the character's backgrounds... one scene thirty minutes within has Kidman speaking to Penn in a theater for a few minutes as Penn was about to fall asleep as his eyes were getting dreary. There were a lot of camera cuts with no significance behind them and there's plenty of scenes where there are no talk and the suspense, if there was any, was just silly, like the bus scene, as it's made out to be an amateur directed film by veteran Sydney Pollack with a tier of high profiled performers. They all didn't really try and put in effort that reached their fullest capability... of course, blame the poorly written story that no viewer can connect to. The script's plot was complex where the dialogue wasn't and this is where the real thrillers prevail over movies like these, but it is the slowest new movie in a while. The main problem is nothing constructive goes on and too many scenes had no value behind them. The movie had a lame attempt to throw in some romance with such lines as - Please, I need to know you're okay... It has nothing to do with you. It will rarely put anyone on the edge of their seats, unless they are anticipating to the end to leave.

Final Grade: D

Bringing Up Baby (1938)
Starring Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant

Film Prophet's Review...
The start of stardom soars in two different gender classes featuring the most prolific movie performers of all-time, with an under-rated director, Howard Hawks, in a start of wacky comedy movies. This movie, not nominated for a single Academy award, is considered the most inspired comedy film that contains average pace, comic material, pitfalls, awkward situations, misunderstandings, and zany antics. An unlikely relationship of two individuals, one a paleontologist and the other is an impulsive heiress, forms after a dinosaur bone was taken away by her dog as her leopard pet, named Baby, causes trouble for the both of him. At the same time, Grant's character tries to get a million dollars for his museum. Hepburn makes her character wild and eccentric and he is romantically captured to her dumbfounded, old fashioned character and attempts to prove her wrong in such areas like cars and golf. During the story of unusual acts with mix-ups and crashes, it shows how a pain animals are on a trail and simultaneously, humans for misinterpreting vital situations of activity. Everyone has the capability to come in to the film and afterwards, really like it. Though, Film Prophet enjoyed the dozen final minutes and some other scenes, there are slight enjoyable surprises in deficient of complete attention to the movie, due to the poor character development and a yawning non-progressing story that once it had moments of mind that didn't last for more than a couple minutes at an instance. The conversations were mainly about disagreements and arguments while the story was not quite up to amazing standards. It wasn't integrated in full pleasure or real laughable moments or lines, apart from the wacky ordeals. Both Hepburn and Grant work the screen well enough like they always do and institute their characters around an adverse script of misadventures and mistaken identities where sadly a viewer will seldom lose interest on and off with the story.

Final Grade: B/B-

Labyrinth (1986)
Starring Jennifer Connelly and David Bowie

Film Prophet's Review...
Fed up with her step mother and baby brother, Sarah, Connelly, becomes frustrated and she wishes the goblin king, Bowie, would take her brother away. Seconds later, she got her wish and immediately regrets her mistake. In order to get her brother back safe at home, she must find a way through a labyrinth maze beginning from her bedroom and ending at the castle where her brother is before time expires and he becomes a goblin. Sarah realizes all the tantrums and toys are nothing compared to family and friends as she meets unlikely friends along the way and the lesson remains throughout the film of taking things for granted. Back in the fault to those childhood days, this one brings back memories from what I remembered as a child watching it for first time. There were bits of pieces in my head recently before I saw it again as the story wasn't complete and I missed out on the details. I recalled how enjoyable and fascinated I was with my first watch gripping on to what will happen as she faces all kinds of struggles through the labyrinth maze and it still was while putting this review together. The movie is a typical eighties story teller with great camera views from inside the maze and mini adventures that was a major fantasy success mixing human characters with costumed puppet goblins. The creatures themselves, ranging from insect fairies to talking worms, were genuine as they were created by director Jim Henson. The characters and tension the plot lets out may be incredible to young viewers because of the fact centering around evil, the inherent ugliness of some creatures, and turning the brother into a goblin may not rest well. David Bowie as the goblin king I didn't really like as an actor, except for his couple songs he sung were cool, but I kept picturing that his role should have been portrayed by an actress. Looking back and watching the movie over, it's neat that Connelly, now an Oscar winning actress, was the young heroine who had to manage to get past all the paths and stipulations. The magic begins to work on the viewers from Henson's design and David Bowie's music... most importantly, the added talent of Connelly was awesome, charming, and fun entrapping viewers with her riveting magnetism off the wonderful story. Her performance was very believable in a not so believable plot of course suited to the fantasy genre as an absorbing childhood fantasy tale that lingers to be special.

Final Grade: B/B-

Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (1922)
Starring Max Schreck, Gustav von Wangenheim, Greta Schroder, Alexander Granach

Film Prophet's Review...
F. W. Murnau's German horror silent movie, which is considered the first horror film, is the first and original tale adapted from Bram Stoker's classic novel about Dracula to be shown on a motion picture that opened the door for other stories relating to vampires to arrive later. After the visit of Jonathan Hutter, Count Orlok follows him to Bremen shipped by boat to the town and brings his plague for his obsession with Hutter's wife. As old as it is, it remains scary because of the central makeup of Count Orlok's figure, the mysterious distorted tentacle-fingered bloodsucking baby stepping vampire possessing of absurd, weird behavior who needs to "drink the blood of the young, the blood necessary to his own existence." The Count's castle is isolated from villages and when Hutter travels to the place, it seems the villagers give little notice about Dracula as they never feed him any knowledge or true warnings as he is uninformed about his identity. The only trait are the books that give him, his wife, and the audience insight about vampires. Divulging the secretive strange life, there are sights of caskets, blood, victims, and dazed people. The story does wander a bit strolling in pieces that are unimportant to the actual tale and it gets a bit stretched, in particular when the story uses plenty of unknown random people and when a professor discusses how plants are like vampires becomes gross. Though it's not a very long movie, the creepy performances, gothic sets, expressionistic lighting, and visuals create such an uncanny mood.  The factor of the organ pipe music sincerely captures the vibe of what the movie wants and assists the whole sparkly black and white film. The great thing about this is that the viewer will most likely be the only person watching the movie in the entire world at the time, which is incredible and even more thrilling that no one is alive from the making of this film. The dicey unauthorized experimental film is less fatal, more on the ghostly paranormal aging side haunting as ancient.

Final Grade: B+/B

His Girl Friday (1940)
Starring Rosalind Russell, Cary Grant, Ralph Bellamy, Gene Lockhart, Porter Hall

Film Prophet's Review...
Careers get in the way of love as a top reporter's editor attempts to stop her from marrying and to remarry him. The screwball comedy is a particular example in film history that brings a new angle to films. Grant is the star playing kind of a bad guy against a prototypical nice guy and it was hysterical in the number of ways and times Grant set him up to put him in jail for one evening so he can spend time with Russell's character in the havoc journalist life, but it is Russell I was more so moved by as she was very fun to watch. The story is both a love story and a sophisticated battle of the sexes in the media. There's lying, unethical news journalists starting false rumors who were all lazy men and place bets while the one woman does everything and she is smart at it. The tale gets into things rather quickly about imminent marriage then manages to keep up with the slapstick raising loud dialogue with character's exasperated looks. The dialogue is fast, smart and funny and requires great listening so many people won't laugh as one might endure as there is no break from the constant dialogue as some of it will go over the viewer's heads. Not one Academy award nomination was toward this film, probably because of the sound and quality. Directed by Howard Hawks, it displays the furious life of a journalist and men who would do anything for a story. Very well acted in skillful one shot sequences as most of the movie is shot in one room... Grant's charisma traps attention and its supported by a believable performance by Rosalind Russell, who reminds me of Katharine Hepburn with more energy. The movie is perplexing, fanatical, double crossing, sharp, busy, and rapid quick to the lines in a fast pace of ninety minutes.

Final Grade: B+/B

I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997)
Starring Jennifer Love Hewitt, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Ryan Phillippe, Freddie Prinze Jr.

Film Prophet's Review...
The movie is a super film to re-watch over and over throughout time because the movie's most memorable scenes, which are found in about half of the movie, daunt back on the viewer where they are stunning... the balcony, the vacant locker room, "what are you waiting for," trapped in a cop car... everyone will be surprised or re-surprised by this film because they can't figure out what will happen next and the people who think they have it figured out don't. The script had powerful one liners delivered by Phillippe early on when their car ran over a guy during the night and the confusion to what to do takes place is the most memorable scene from any teen horror film. Four teenagers celebrating the summer accidentally run down a man on the road. Not thinking straight, they dump the body in the sea and swear to secrecy. One year later, they get a note with just the movie's title written on it. Really perfect casting to the film as they never have been better... in their stardom prime, the charming and appealing protagonist quartet dreams are shattered after the one year and it is interesting to see the changes from being one year on top of the world to upsetting young adults. The audience will want the quartet to win and battle the plot as the audience will covet and fight for them. The key of the gripping movie is the tremendous pacing and it keeps up the excellent drama and intensity pumping adrenaline lasting though every... every scene. The screenplay is terrific with a dose of irony as the group can't go to the police because they've dumped the body in the sea before. The person who wrote the note one year later turns out to be a killer wanting them dead... teasing them in ways with no one around is to help or rescue them. This one had it all... eerie tension and music, awesome camera angles, point of views, a moving plot, a pinnacle ending... everything a frightening film needs to have. Since this movie, filmmakers have tried to write originals of contemporary teen life being scary as copy cat films have failed. The unknown murderer is able to kill someone, sometimes eliminating a potential killer guess, without leaving traces of blood as the editing has some schemes to ignore those parts quickly. The quartet begins doubting each other... "Julie gets her hair chopped off, I get run over by my car, Heather gets a body in her trunk, and you get a letter? That's balance!" The pure startling machine never falls to stupidity of any character and the witty moments shine during the fantastic plot.

Final Grade: B+/A-

Sullivan's Travels (1941)
Starring Joel McCrea, Veronica Lake, Eric Blore, Robert Warwick, William Demarest

Film Prophet's Review...
The film is on the lines of a movie about a movie artist and the social realism of the world satirizing Hollywood and sparing an entertaining verbal slapstick comedy. Grasping on real ideas, Sullivan, McCrea, a popular filmmaker who wants to make a movie that comments on the Depression era seeks to go visit uncomfortable parts of the world to gather ideas. "This picture is an answer to Communists. It shows we're awake and not dunking our heads in the sand like a bunch of ostriches." Away from the studio and the reporters, he desperately wants to make destiny designed to meet life's lesser lessons. "I don't know where I'm going, but I'm not coming back till I know what trouble is." After a beginning of co-workers consulting and arguing, the next morning he leaves dressed as a hobo with ten cents in search of problems that confront the average man. He begins a remarkable travel alone to poverty and policemen. Unfamiliar with hardships, he finds the lovely Veronica Lake, an enjoyable asset to match with Sullivan acting as a hobo improving on spot to the wannabe actress to start. Directed by Preston Sturges, the story is an enlightening appreciation of the way things are as the vignettes of Sullivan's travels get more serious in the last quarter, researching and rediscovering the daily lives of the less wealthy. Although, the mere weakness of the movie is its predictability and the brisk chatter, the message that is a prototype to not only films, but life in general opens up that will lighten the audience, displaying several moods. The film factors in realistic camera angles, such as the train scene, the study of human kindness and cruelty, socialism, and of course, comedy relief. "Film is the greatest educational medium the world has ever known."

Final Grade: B/B+

Charade (1963)
Starring Audrey Hepburn, Cary Grant, Walter Matthau, James Coburn, George Kennedy

Film Prophet's Review...
A potentially thrilling romance turns into an upsetting dissatisfaction. If a movie can't make one think and marvel or ensue to stay on top of the story, it would be an awful, disappointing movie... example: Charade. A woman returns to Paris to find her husband murdered and this sets the tone of wonders and questions, except wonders and questions hardly occur. The classy mystery has four men following her and the beginning is not fully engaging as one would hope and imagine it to be. What the movie has is two big, likable stars at the time in Grant and Hepburn and they are supported by a decent group. What it doesn't have is an excellent screenplay and camera work, fair character depth, and strong music that would create a stylish mood. It came up short of pulling in interest after the mediocre set-up and hurt the chances of it being really special. For instance, the biggest events in the movie are taken insipidly to elaborate a concern to the viewer that doesn't discharge. There wasn't a backbone to the story and no, Hepburn wasn't it because her character's personality, not her, was mildly dull without a bottomless meaning to show heart. She was too sensitive and fragile as Grant would just wonder around to feel important and add a charm in being her bodyguard because she's helpless on her own. I waited for some surprises or drama, but the movie dragged to scenes that didn't have anything to do with the actual murder and went towards a poor romance and even the story sometimes forgets the true point of the film. For that reason, the viewer won't ever sense that she is in danger and it lacks any presence of suspected villains. The non-memorable villains are so minor that their roles are really cameos. Also, the color quality of the picture was very lifeless and not vibrant... similar to the original The Pink Panther movie, where most of the movie can be compared to this one. There were numerous ditzy conversations and one liners that became too tiresome. If the viewer can see pass Hepburn and Grant, he or she would arrive at an uninteresting script.

Final Grade: C/C-

Sin City (2005)
Starring Bruce Willis, Jessica Alba, Mickey Rourke, Clive Owen, Rosario Dawson, Brittany Murphy, Jaime

Film Prophet's Review...
"Don't scream." The story shifts to three pieces from the graphic comics by Frank Miller as they all intertwine back to one night at a bar in a fictional corrupt town that never sheds any daylight. The characters of Rourke seek the murderer of a beauty and the beast one night stand, Willis is a retiring cop who is framed, and Owen is tempted to kill a rogue cop. It's always kept dark to add an effect to the cinematography. It was black and white for a reason because the colors would contrast like a glow in a dark sticker and cancel out any real gore if seen in its fullest color. For any reason, sometimes color would show the gorgeous eyes of Bledel, the color yellow of a face, red shoes and dress and either outcome, the visuals will astound people. It is great to see a film-noir style revived from the forties into a remarkable modern cinematic film with technical animation keeping the voiceover narration right to every word tying into the present status. "Walk down the right back alley in Sin City and you can find anything." I would like to stress the last word in that quote because everything and anything exists in Sin City. The movie will be more fun if one knows many of the performers in this film as the supporting cast are yet appealing, so here's a list to mention - Benicio Del Toro, Elijah Wood, Michael Clarke Duncan, Carla Gugino, Josh Hartnett, Michael Madsen, Alexis Bledel, Nick Stahl, and Devon Aoki - not to mention, there are a whole lot of parts that will make the viewer laugh. Most of the performers seize the ability to send out raw tension and they all were awesome and extraordinary as Rourke was a monster and a beast to mankind. The two characters, acted by Wood and Aoki, who never say a word turn out to do the most nasty things with killings of movement and instruments. Relating to a no holds barred fight, there's plenty of scars, violence, outbursts, women, youth, alleys, brutality, revenge, mean powerful men, gore, prostitutes, backstabs, cannibalism, mobs... a man's movie if one would mention. The men are bad and big - heroic or anti-heroic - and about every woman is a beautiful whore and half of them have deadly skills... there is no decency. The viewer will never know how long a character will last, although the movie's bag of tricks are exposed from the first few scenes, there were a dozen of ways to escape from a near death situation or a way of killing that never have been shown on a screen before this movie and it keeps anyone engaged. "It's time to prove to your friends that you're worth a damn. Sometimes that means dying... sometimes it means killing a whole lot of people.

Final Grade: A-/B+

Reds (1981)
Starring Warren Beatty, Diane Keaton, Maureen Stapleton, Jack Nicholson, Gene Hackman, Paul Sorvino

Film Prophet's Review...
Warren Beatty has the leading role, he wrote it, and won best Oscar director too for this movie on a true story of an American journalist who is very passionate living in the time of the Russian revolution, although no location shots were on Russia due to the cold war still occurring. The film includes documentary on Russian theories, rallies, and debates on the country's socialist control and the commentary is done by elders behind a black background who lived and knew the journalist couple. They explain the causes to the revolution as the movie continues to unravel the love couple's story in the time of journalist John Reed and his wife witness the Russian revolution. The economy and people who agree or disagree with it covers the citizen's opinions to the journalist as the point of view of the story. The interviews by documentary adds comments that's nice to explain from a primary source on what happened, but it halts the story to do so. The film is very calm and settled in the first hour... make that the whole three hours, though some strong words were expressed, nothing is memorable or striking. It's very light on the entertainment and more on the gentle drama flow. The dress was appropriate and the idea of anti-America and patriotism was also presented from the Russian side, but it's a little too classy which concludes to be boring and it's focused on the hierarchy status of upright wealthy people rather than covering any slum territory. Aside from the intelligence in the talks, between the plots there's some humor involved that timed right when it was there during the long story sticking to parties and investigations and when Nicholson's non-political character disappears for an hour, the film also takes a dip. The storyline mimics a Butler-O'Hara relationship who always have their problems, splits, get back together, and repeat the process. The characters don't ever settle their personal problems as this love triangle is very repetitive and indecisive. Keaton complains and pitches her voice to an extreme annoying magnitude to her husband at various occurrences and anytime a person raises their voice, it lasts quite some time and in the end, it's completely dull. Many scenes can be ignored when it involves a political talk between two or more men or when anyone walks around without knowing his or her destination with a zoomed out view. The conventions and the relation with journalists during discussions had insightful views on political parties, but it does lack inspiring scenes as it seems the script was more written from a history textbook. The long and overblown movie is not viewable again because of it's length and much needed endurance and without a semi-great cast, the movie would be no where without them.

Final Grade: C/C-

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)
Starring Tim Curry, Barry Bostwick, Susan Sarandon, Richard O'Brien, Peter Hinwood

Film Prophet's Review...
Viewed and preferred as the most identified and prevalent cult classic film, setting up a sci-fi musical movie matched with a rock and roll style of sound, although it's unordinary. A couple planning on getting married head to a hotel, but their car breaks down and they find a castle to stay at instead and inside the place holds members from outer space Transylvania who like to sing constantly. The movie contained wicked costumes and makeup while some of the characters had sexual urges and futility, other character's attributes were being transsexuals. The vision of watching a man with lipstick will make the viewer feel dirtier than the person actually is. Similar to constructing a Grease meets Spaceballs film, it didn't feel like I was watching an actual movie because of all the disparity and absurdity to the quality of the film making. The sound effects and voices hurt the condition often, a lot of things are spoofs on past fictional movies, and rather than talking, a person would start singing out of nowhere for whatever reason, which was sort of funny and soon got old. The talks are in rhythm too as where most of the songs just repeat the refrain line over and over again near the end of the song. The problem is that no one part of the movie seemed to take this movie serious and new characters would enter every so few scenes to add a particular spice for a couple minutes, which resulted in yet another singing original song leading to a chorus of others to join in on the fun, then they fade away underneath the leading cast. The acting is overly done and spotty on purpose, although, Tim Curry was really amazing for being a weird transvestite tallying a fun personality to the mix. The second half of the movie had cyclic monotonous and inconsistent entertainment valued at a small amount.

Final Grade: C+/C

The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
Starring Maria Falconetti, Eugene Silvain, Andre Berley, Maurice Schutz

Film Prophet's Review...
A French peasant girl opposing occupying British forces is tried for heresy and witchcraft and burned at stake. Joan is condemned to be sent from god to save France and win a victorious battle. Silent movies are as shocking as they come because of all the emotions are confined to the acting and because of the correctly placed close up edits amazingly only through facial expressions in this film, the movie delivers an excellent notch of sentiment. Maria Falconetti as Joan of Arc portrays her stellar and it's the only performance she's starred in and has been judged as the best female performance ever and the best portrayal of a past figure... she does everything right. Initially believed to be lost in a fire, the French movie is the original and the best story telling of Joan of Arc. The story records the start of the trial to the death of Joan going straight into things in court where the Cauchon questions her allegiance and declaration. There's no ineffective flashbacks to a war or family relatives and it only concerns the trial. They interrogate Joan having a fun time bullying and questioning her denials and salvation and this is a fine example of ignorance and impatience to the church's hierarchy. "So you are certain of being saved?" Re-edited with a strong church choir, the beautiful composed music adds an outstanding dimension to the timeless story. Along with the vastly impressive framework and captions, the movie penetrates an artistic, detailed, realistic genuine moving film to a religious one or anyone provided by great acting all around and a great pace to the story to keep one's interest intact till the end. Joan of Arc is heroic in the observation of the Film Prophet presenting to befall youth, spirit, anguish, and belief.

Final Grade: A-

The Grand Illusion (1937)
Starring Jean Gabin, Erich von Stroheim, Pierre Fresnay, Werner Florian

Film Prophet's Review...
In the French film, the story was between class and national identity during World War I focusing primarily on three aristocratic French officers in the army where the characters were divided into class structures and the higher officers moan about how the middle class is rising. It's a war movie that focuses on the settings, not on a battlefield, where the characters are thrown together by war to an area without a battle. Not only is war a commotion to humanity, but also the prison camp where this movie spends most of its time on the escapes and customs of it. It opens up the way of a poignant display with its French cinematography and language as everything is alright at the moment. Awaiting for something to occur, it persists to remain unentertaining while the one-sided story is set basic and it doesn't take any turns from a remedial scene, which comes unfulfilled in the beginning, just like any use of war violence. The dialogue between the men is too gentle and insignificant towards a narrative and they pronounce a number of information about their troops, but it ignores a struggle or a conflict that is pushed way past the beginning which is late for anything to unfasten to fall into the story the direction it wants to take. It also lacks female significance and contributions, again, that is pushed to the end and it's done so horribly. Film Prophet is slightly disappointed after reflecting on all the raves this movie received. Jean Renoir needed to get the - considerate of one other through any regulation ensuing loyalty and duty - message out there better. The movie is more on the daily routines off of monotony because there isn't much to do except eating, dressing, and singing in a chore with ramblings along with bad jokes than an actual clash or disagreement between two opposing sides. For this reason, the unexciting story leaves the viewer from being involved enough as one should and it continues to do so throughout the movie to the point where a viewer loses most if not all its attention to the characters.

Final Grade: C

The Ring Two (2005)
Starring Naomi Watts, David Dorfman, Simon Baker, Elizabeth Perkins, Gary Cole, Sissy Spacek

Film Prophet's Review...
The misfortune of this horror sequel where the original didn't need one as a matter of fact, it was a totally ridiculous idea revolving around nonsense about a little girl who's been dumped down a well in the abyss dragging its viewers through a television screen from a video tape lacks logic, but she still manages to communicate through supernatural video equipment. In this horrific child theme sequel, everything is fine until the static suspicion and that video tape returns. Film Prophet did not see this because it's a dismay movie that lacks intelligence cracking to be hip. I disliked The Ring and anyone's view who thought it was scary. The single reason that drew me in was through the power of Naomi Watts, my number one favorite actress, who convinced me to watch it because I love seeing what kind of acts she has in her latest films. Though in the first one, it was a bunch of stares, gasps, and quiet screams. Her appearance has a plus when her hair is also straight, but she has wet curly hair some of the time in this film. Her natural talent connects with the audience bar from the weak parts by means of direction and storytelling, but the art makeup and visual effects are clearly embedded when they are there. It's a movie when people get bothered by asking questions or hearing them from others and not knowing the answers to them because the story contains an indistinct message and too many faults, where the story is a bit fuzzy and once an answer may finally appear with any relevance, it eludes past it to the next scene... the movie can't even respond well to its own story that's profound on nothing. Afterwards, the story follows a series of creepy pieces that pause and attempts to spook at the suspense and half of the movie dragged on about consulting the kid. It's vastly boring for a horror film that has no excitement with exceptions of one scene with killer deer, but of course, Watts and Dorfman were the only two on the road that time. Riding off weak dialogue from a below par script that was begging for boredom from the pity start, the supporting cast doesn't add any merit to the storytelling either as they can be easily forgotten because of their minuscule roles. The Ring Two acts like a second-rate Secret Window and a fifteen minute Twilight Zone show, but even those do a better job picturing a middling story.

Final Grade: C-/D

Oldboy (2003)
Starring Min-sik Choi, Ji-tae Yu, Hye-jeong Kang, Byeong-ok Kim

Film Prophet's Review...
A guy who was locked up for no cause has a fictional movie made up for no reason which should be locked up too where no one will see either of them. An average man, Choi, is kidnapped and imprisoned in a hotel room for fifteen years trapped and locked in that small room as the audience is as clueless as he is while the movie opens confusing to give the expression of knowing nothing. He is thrown into a clutter and gets terrorizes in strange ways. Fighting with determination to get out, the ambiguous tale is about revenge which is as old as it gets. However, movies greatly still have thrilling tragedies and vengeance to show, but it doesn't come from this film at all. The movie works for itself, not for the audience. The lack of cleverness, originality, and compassionate consideration to deliver an experience to get involved has a plot that seems so simple, but then again, it can't be explained entirely because of the uncertain plot holes. The plot is far-fetched by manipulating the audience into the trendy dilemma with its unnecessary violence and the screenplay gets a little chaotic too with unbelievable hallucinations. For about twenty minutes, I became disgusted with the gross sequences after he got out of the room because they were dry and tedious with no entertainment fronting to an unconvincing follow up on what happens next. He comes back and terrorizes his foes in sick and disgusting ways and the director handles them ugly and brutal in addition to having no message out of a futile premise. The story line is underdeveloped and contains no depth and when it attempts to, most of the scenes and subtitles can be ignored because on a consistent scale, the line would always be below the norm of an average movie's thrilling momentum, in which this movie was degrading to a clog of dust sloping to another meaningless scene of violence that doesn't communicate back as great action. The enemies are terrible and too easy to knock out, the music is abundantly energized and up-beat for no purpose, and Film Prophet was waiting for someone to explain something logical with a worthy importance and this forces the viewer to think about it, but there is refusal indication to think on as Film Prophet in particular, got mad and aggravated at the flow of the movie where it also botched to settle in a comprehendible matter.

Final Grade: D/F

The Thin Red Line (1998)
Starring Sean Penn, James Caviezel, Nick Nolte, Elias Koteas, Adrien Brody, John Cusack, Jared Leto

Film Prophet's Review...
Experiences of a group of soldiers about to go into battle at Guadalcanal against the Japanese during the second World War in the Pacific shows the demoralization and humanity sides. Respected director Terrence Malick shows war causing effects on innocent nature and their animals or people and it destroys them off just so like the men. The natural environment is highly examined with the waters, grassy plain lands, and the green forests as its dictating war against nature, where nature isn't part of their take such when it opens to a slow pace of images of this malevolence and long time spanned shots, the film is down to earth. Caviezel's placid and kind character is the voice of the story expressing the nature, accounting to others in their different positions. Here, the narration shifts over voices by inner-mind mediocre psychological personal point of views pronounced in a soliloquy on the world as the introduction of a character and when the movie ends, all those views are elapsed and it filled in too much time. The movie's other weakness was that it's three hours of a war film where not once was there an emotional tear jerking scene. Some scenes and camera views feel so real where the viewers can become almost as nervous as the soldiers. I thought I'd never mention this to any film, but the sound mixing was really incredible and effective to the overall quality where at any moment any sound can occur. During the movie, someone comes in the picture and can fall right down without getting to know him as this is the way some of the characters are introduced in the story. It's how soldiers are brought into combat. Some of the cameo appearances by well known actors - John C. Reilly, Woody Harrelson, Ben Chaplin, John Travolta, and George Clooney - in small parts may last for only five minutes, but war never ends. For example, Cusack arrives halfway through the film and the audience doesn't know how long he will survive. Part of the attachment to the film comes from these talents from the ensemble cast. The scenery of battleground life is where the drama and most of the attention entraps as it becomes the best war movie to portray battlegrounds. It illustrates fear and pressure conquering over being brave, accurate language communication back at home or in the fields to enemies, victorious parts, anger and sadness, disagreements over orders, and the error of war - dropping like flies with no relief for pain and injuries heading on an indefinite line.. a thin one that shatters bright red. They only have one another for aid that's not really reliable in courageous machinery situations. "What difference do you think you can make, one single man in all this madness, you die it's going to be for nothing."

Final Grade: B/B+

The Lost Weekend (1945)
Starring Ray Milland, Jane Wyman, Howard Da Silva, Doris Dowling, Phillip Terry

Film Prophet's Review...
Film Prophet likes the Billy Wilder and Ray Milland recipe here and as a matter of fact, they both won Oscars along with best picture for this film. The movie is an enticing and realistic tale of an alcoholic's binge, however the movie becomes plain and too uniform. Milland acts out this character in an engrossing picture set in New York City as an extraordinary lifestyle of a chronic alcoholic who ruins his life and career of a writer. He is casual first off, yet he's really addicted and desperate that he hides bottles in secret places he won't even recall and plans schemes while the people around him have tried before to prevent him from his indulgences as Wilder directs this almost flawlessly. The plot releases when he skips his trip for the weekend to Long Island. When there's a site of alcohol in his radius, it wins as he won't get some control and drink anything else besides whiskey. It's all drinks for him... no food and no sleep. The plot centers on that one idea for the length of the film as he gets as far as random visits to the bar with a few flashbacks to his additive, nervous past and occurrences where his lady love loses to his alcohol, then wonders away in search of more binging. His addiction has over-come any sense of dealing with burden and there's no holding him back. Indeed the point has already been expressed, bar from Wilder's offer on a range of aspects to it, but there's also little to pose since it's off of one concept. The dialogue at times came somewhat predictable and not much arrived at a surprise from it, given that the plot was also one-dimensional. For that reason, some relevance and techniques used in modern era films have recalled its stand and the movie grows each scene climbing to a great ending making a delicate film at best, but not close to being among Wilder's top five directed movies.

Final Grade: B-/B

Beautiful Girls (1996)
Starring Timothy Hutton, Matt Dillon, Michael Rapaport, Natalie Portman, Uma Thurman, Mira Sorvino

Film Prophet's Review...
During a snowy winter in a small fictional town, a group of lifelong buddies get together, drink, and struggle to connect with the women who affect their decisions and dreams. A former high school stud, Dillon, continues to embrace feelings for his ex-girlfriend complicating his relationship with his current lover. Willie Conway, Hutton, is the main character from the group of men who is at the crossroads in his life. Although he cherishes his girlfriend city attorney, he meets Marty, Portman, a curious and smart thirteen year old next door neighbor. The primary reason why I saw this film is because I wanted to see another performance from Natalie Portman who I can't get enough of from the moment till she came on till her last showing... similar to Willie for being so interested in her. Speaking of age, she is so alluring that even Willie over ten years older finds a connection to. Trying to stay cool by refusing to grow up at almost mid-age sets an obvious maturity theme, but it's really immaturity for the cast who don't want to accept what's coming ahead yet. Everyone has been through these times sometime so people can relate with some of the contemporary material. After a - hey, how are you, ok, pause - start of getting re-acquainted, the audience realizes each character has some life and originality to the story. Not everything can be fun as the movie shows a bittersweet look at relationships. The problem is these guys are almost reaching middle age and the women also won't let them grow up because they don't want marriage for example. "This ain't high school anymore." The women are also indecisive and uncommitted. Lauren Holly's character as the once popular mean girl wasn't resolved and left me clueless. My favorite scene is Uma Thurman's first appearance arriving in the tavern talking to the group of guys and the best speech is by Rosie O'Donnell in the grocery store about fake beautiful girls in magazines who are non-existent, but like other women, she doesn't demonstrate her mission either. It's a heartfelt movie of moving on forward leaving regrets behind and yearning to be young once more... the normal life and setting makes a normal movie.

Final Grade: B-

Robots (2005)
Voices by Ewan McGregor, Robin Williams, Halle Berry, Mel Brooks, Greg Kinnear, Stanley Tucci

Film Prophet's Review...
Rodney is a young dreamer and an inventing robot who always wanted to meet Big Weld, the best inventor robots have seen. When he reaches the city to find him, he is not there to be found and in his place is Ratchet, who wants as much money and power he can get. Rodney and a group of pals try to rescue his hero and prevent Ratchet's further plans. The writers of the film threw a bunch of nifty ideas together... half of which can be found in past popular culture where it's ridiculed upon, and the other half is their own ideas relating to the robot world and its functions. It tried to resemble humans as much as possible like any CGI animated story, nevertheless, the animated movie was still in deficient of practicality and reasonableness. Most of the movie was expressed by how robots would look as if they were just like humans living in their own world showing daily routines and the evolution children go through focusing in on their metal body parts. The class structure of their city was imprecise because it showed that there were only two ladders... the thousands of average robots and the couple who run and control the robot world in a corporate fashion and what they do affects the thousands in a collectivism ruling. The story also took many breaks from the direction it was bearing to. For example, after thirty minutes of revealing what the robots are all about, the actual anecdote moved very slowly which allowed time in between for comedy jokes voiced by Robin Williams, robots to whine about how their body parts don't function properly, wild coasters from nowhere occur, and more popular gags resulting in a hiatus to the minimal plot. Half of the story and it's ultimate pinnacle was pushed to the near end of the movie where the music kicked up to a high volume and all of the character's problems were resolved and crammed within the final time frame right before the big clash and dance by the town's folk of a finale. The talents of the numerous voices were definitely there, but the computer work prevailed over the writing where the little guys usually win.

Final Grade: C/C-

Persona (1966)
Starring Bibi Andersson, Liv Ullmann, Margaretha Krook

Film Prophet's Review...
Director Ingmar Bergman owns the best Swedish film work of all-time, although sad to say, Persona is too unclear for the average viewer for it to be among his best work. It's an unique human drama with a psychological plot used as a centered template for modern films. An actress, Ullmann, who did silent films, but for no more because the genre is obsolete, is unhappy with her abortion and all the horrible things in life. The nurse, Andersson, brings her out away from the medical center to her seaside home. They share similarities by personality except one can't talk and verbally express herself. Eventually, the nurse gets annoyed with speaking to herself as she believes she is studying her as the film gets destructed literally. Ingmar does this by complex visual imagery that creates a profoundly unsettled feeling on interpreting people. There's obscene flashing vignettes, some are which long black fades, to open the movie that are too rigid to watch, and other times it's pitch quiet, but there's disturbing constant background sounds, such as a dripping from a faucet, that is irritating and when a part of this happens, it symbolizes a conflict between the two. The viewing is all natural... still images of bare depression, can't get comfortable, and a fear of being surrounded by dullness and distraught with a striking look. Not everyone is going to connect to this movie because it's very avant-garde plotting experimental filming techniques in messy places. It has themes of extinction and cruelty and a lot of sub-par quotes on the meaning of life and it is when the movie picks up when the two women discuss life to each other, mostly the nurse of course since she isn't the mute, the audience becomes the actress as the listener to the voice of the film as we learn about the two. "You smell of dreams and tears." I am glad the actress of the nurse was Bibi Andersson, who Ingmar effectively uses and relies solely on her speeches since there was no extras used in the film. He finds a way not to make a movie too dull involving two women for the majority of the time. Besides the images, the morality is in her dialogue as the film misses a few key notes to entertain and understand fully, which leaves interpretations open. "You are cold and indifferent."

Final Grade: B-/B

Magnolia (1999)
Starring Tom Cruise, John C. Reilly, Julianne Moore, William H. Macy, Philip Seymour Hoffman

Film Prophet's Review...
"Strange things happen all the time." A humane study of individuals with perspectives and pressures is visible though a complex day of catastrophes, consequences, and frustrations found in the story's character's lives. There are complications, yet natural events that stress the fantastic and weird subconscious world for three hours long where every scene adds something and almost each scene has a continuous instrumental score that carries out to the next. On one struggling and impossible day in the San Fernando Valley of nine lives living guilt and lies, a male nurse care takes over a dying man who has a famous lost son, a cop is in love, a boy genius on a game show, an ex-boy genius feeling detached, a game show host and his estranged daughter will each become part of the dazzling multiplicity of plots through one movie sharing divine intervention. Reilly is a cop who discusses his job trying to make it his best through the ignorance and arrogance of others living the unpredicted as he gets noise complaints to attend. The long, dying, monotonous exposition presented in his voice-over had a disarranged looking setting using wild camera pans and zooms simultaneously, but that was just an appetizer. The movie's strength is lasting an unsettling tense intrepid feeling within one because the characters can be so real in which these severe things can be happening right now. The acting is tremendous and everyone in the movie had a significant token to bring to the odd characters towards a top of the power line for drama movies. It seems the actors fed off each other in their scenes together and from viewing preceding ones that set the motive of the type of resilience and determination to perform. "I will drop kick those dopes if they come near me." Film Prophet was over-whelmed over the fact this movie contained Cruise and Moore who both had their best performances from this film... ever in a film. Cruise's character runs a high energized, hilarious, and meaningful seminar for single men in the spotlight, which the successful motivational speaker teaches them how to seduce a woman and leave her. "I will not apologize for who I am." No one is the same and everyone is different. People get agitated over perceptions of other people concerning them, and the scene where Moore gets her prescription is a superb example. Stop asking questions and mind your own business is one of the messages. The world is a mess and the movie pinpoints drama in certain areas that lasts for three full hours. "I'm quietly judging you." The dinner date conversation between Reilly and Walters is my favorite scene of them all. The movie says the past is not through with us.  The movie also features the most bizarre weather scene ever that reminds the audience that everything is okay, really. Nothing is normal and nobody is normal. Everything has problems and everyone is in trouble.

Final Grade: A

Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
Starring Joseph Cotten, Teresa Wright, Patricia Collinge, Macdonald Carey, Henry Travers

Film Prophet's Review...
Plot turns come at the correct time from the correct mind of the best director of the suspense genre, director Alfred Hitchcock. The underestimated gem has little profanity and adultery situations as it's filled with raw thrills and pure staging of climactic scenes. The witty story takes away the tranquility of it's setting to reveal evil where it's least expected. Before growing past the boundaries of an average town in California, the story is introduced a little too comforting displaying a family, who will soon welcome a surprising visit from an uncle to his sister's family as the daughter also invited him to stay before now knowing he is suspected in a murder on the east coast as a pair of detectives without a photo are hunting him. Hitchcock sets up the family brilliantly and allows a correct amount of time during scene transitions, each character has important development, and there's perfect music and sound from transferring scenes. The performers do what they are told from his perspective vision on every shot taken. Cotten as Uncle Charlie is purely an under-valued actor as he carried his role with his magnitude and fascinations, but it's also the combination of Cotton and Wright, both named Charlie, who grab the attention within the plot. The daughter Charlie is a golden average girl and Wright has vast range of performing as she stood out the most as superb as any female performance ever on screen. Young Charlie has a clever mark and Hitchcock presents the story with clues and hints visually and verbally where the audience can also judge and guess while young Charlie discovers the truth about her uncle the family knows little about, but love him very, very much. Uncle Charlie does all he can do to hide notices of elucidations and Cotten's voice and identity to the character has an amazing, yet an absurd tone. I was impressed with the lovely talents of the cast I knew little about to deliver all excellent body languages and moods. Every element that Hitchcock uses, and he uses every element, accounting towards this movie is cherished, proper, stellar, and a picture perfect film. Hitchcock's gripping, quick camera point of views presenting with an astounding eyesight are helped by the ensemble who enthralls from the very intelligent written script. It's a film-noir more focused on the individual and family rather than on any cops and Hitchcock dislikes cops. The screenplay written then was staggering, especially where Cotton's inventive character has lines about wives and money at the dinner table followed up by what could be the best said set of lines. "What do you know really... at night you sleep your untroubled ordinary little sleep, filled with peaceful stupid dreams and I brought you nightmares. You live in a dream. You're a sleepwalker blind. The world's a hell, what does it matter what happens in it." Shadow of a Doubt is the first clear standout reviewed film as a Film Prophet Top Honor.

Final Grade: A+

Almost Famous (2000)
Starring Patrick Fugit, Billy Crudup, Kate Hudson, Frances McDormand, Jason Lee, Anna Paquin

Film Prophet's Review...
'When and where does this real world occur?' William, Fugit, is a young teenager inspired by rock and journalism and enters the life backstage accompanying a fledgling band from Michigan called Stillwater on their first tour. He is too young for college and Rolling Stone magazine takes an interest in him and lands an assignment for a piece on the lives of the band Stillwater. The exciting road experience teaches him a life changing lesson about the importance of friends and family... and the same can be said for the band. I went into this movie with neutral expectations without knowing how it may turn out when it's over. Cameron Crowe's script was one of the leaps that gave Kate Hudson a boost to the leading actress she is now. She makes a connection to the audience easily on the way she portrays her character as a band aid of the group. "Famous people are just more interesting." All the performances are excellent and the sequence on the bus with the song Tiny Dancer is one of the finest moments in the film. Philip Seymour Hoffman also plays an unnoticed mentor to William in the film. The mother, McDormand, in this story is losing touch with her two grown up children and constantly tells William not to do drugs. She manages to open the first ten minutes on the subjects she disagrees with against her children and the film's thesis of rock, unidentified with universal and eternal memories of rebellious teenagers trying to have a purpose in life. Thankfully, the movie kept her worrying appearances short later. The film captures three concise age brackets basically, but it is short on the fine explanation of the current time and being cool while it shows backstage life, magazines, photos, managers, fans, and vinyl records. This is the position of the movie as it says if a person growing up in the time doesn't follow rock and roll and become a fan, that person will be misplaced perpetually, which is coming from uneducated people on the infamous rock scene. It does mention no one can explain rock and roll and the movie sticks to that message and doesn't explain it either. There are some insightful things such as Rolling Stone stories being a thorn to bands who tear them up. As the band calls it, the enemy is the rock writer. The humorous lines at moments make the film enjoyable as Crowe's Oscar winning screenplay was assisted by the realism, designs, and costumes while the comedy and emotions absorb the drama.  Elton John's music also fulfills the soundtrack of the film for the seventies. Emotions are drilled in a surprising scene on an airplane twenty minutes till the ending. During an era of how rock and roll changes, the core of the band within the movie's theme enlivens around genuine bonding of friendship and the true art of journalism. William is looking for that key interview with the lead singer, Crudup, but it's kept to a secret handled well by Crowe's writing escaping reality and keeping in touch with it at the same time.

Final Grade: A-

Elektra (2005)
Starring Jennifer Garner, Kirsten Prout, Will Yun Lee, Goran Visnjic, Natassia Malthe

Film Prophet's Review...
From an adapted marvel comic that didn't halt the production and took the female character from the movie Daredevil, Elektra receives her own titled movie as a female protagonist lead. The story follows Elektra, Garner, the beautiful and deadly assassin, who was trained by the Hand, a clan of mystical ninjas. When she turns her back on their ways, they want her dead as she protects a man and his daughter's life who has a secret that the Hand wants. The movie used her character's appeal to its advantage, but it lacks some interesting depth. The best parts of the film were the chases and runaways to nowhere with the villains always knowing where they will be. The plot was going somewhere at times too. The choreography looked neat and so did the sequences, but in scale, it tried too hard because it had to use editing and visual effects, such as slow motion dodges, to the martial arts to dazzle the screen. The pace of the action on the graph would look something like a bunch of Ws as it had no climax because it was scattered everywhere. The villains didn't do much of anything besides showcasing their aptitudes, but the action mostly consists of power ninjas with links to Elektra ala Catwoman and Tomb Raider. Their acting was terrible as Garner's charm and high endurance couldn't save it. The villains were wicked who vanish, but couldn't say their lines while the screenplay was so dull through short one-liners back and forth with sharp stares that were almost painful to listen to. 'How are you doing - Still alive.' 'Doesn't matter, you can't stop her, nobody can stop her.' The dialogue was very lame and considered few thoughts to turn conversations into an interesting legend, as the story says. Some lines have reasons that do no make sense as they're very rushed without a nice introduction and they become unnecessary. 'How did you do that - Get out of here.' 'Enough, it ends now.' It didn't turn out as bad as Daredevil though. The question arises if it will be remembered for almost a dozen months now to take a Razzie home.

Final Grade: C-/C

A Night at the Opera (1935)
Starring Groucho Marx, Chico Marx, Harpo Marx, Kitty Carlisle, Margaret Dumont, Allan Jones

Film Prophet's Review...
The Marx brothers are famous for their originally to bring pure one-liner jokes consistently to the theater. Their jokes have lots of puns out of a minimal plot about madcap friends helping a male and female opera singers to get noticed before a snooty management group of an opera theater. It's not worthy to go all into the story, but it's creditable as it's fundamentally ingenious for today. The story has a minor love angle too to reach out to the female public divergent to the uninhibited behavior routines of the brothers. One of the brothers, Harpo, has a modern day Silent Bob technique of being a bit quiet, yet funny while the brothers together can be related to the guys from Monty Python - oh, the influence... they did it first with a highly better script. Harpo's silent frolics are enchanting, while Chico is up to usual that will receive the jolly type of laughter and big grins. The brothers gave present day history of the best type of humor that was displayed at the time that was immediate to the bullet on their lines. In other work of their films, it's hard to pick out which Marx is who, but Groucho gets the most time on screen as he's the striking star. Groucho makes perhaps the best comedy artist to watch and listen to, up there with Buster Keaton. "When I invite a woman to dinner, I expect her to look at my face. That's the price she has to pay." He is continually the sole funniest act on frame in the movie with brash remarks and contemptible teases of almost anything mocking in slapstick ways, especially to his nemesis, Margaret Dumont. "Get off that bed. What would people say? - They'd probably say you're a very lucky woman." When the movie decides to go music, some musical singing, one in particular three-quarters in the film, drains some of the energy from the funny side. However, the lines continue from the well written screenplay and its at most excellent during Groucho's unique, funny, and zestful observations. The film makes up for about three greatest ingredients found from any film... hands down the best comical performance of all-time by Groucho, the most original screenplay ever written with constant staggering lines, and the final exhilarating ten minutes that had everything.

Final Grade: A-/A

M (1931)
Starring Peter Lorre, Otto Wernicke, Theodor Loos, Ellen Widmann, Inge Landgut

Film Prophet's Review...
Director Fritz Lang is among the most distinguished directors of his time with his unique German style and execution of ideas on screen. A portrait of a compulsive child murderer, Lorre, is examined for the first time in entertainment crossing the lines of traditional silent cinema to a talkie too. The story is an illustrious psychological view with an incredible development of early film ideas via an ambiguity in ethical issues awarding the audience with a perspective with each side of the case that is difficult to resolve. He adds ways to help entertain the viewers without any music at all. There is no music or scores as every scene is quiet unless environment sounds or human voices occur and his non-human presence shots are eerie. The acting is very true and realistic and fond to fit any concern. Not many things are pretty in the story. The characters aren't pretty and there is always problems between the cops and criminals. The conflict is that there's a frequent unknown child murderer in the town where restless cops go very strict to prevail, inspecting and raiding everywhere as they upset the town because he hasn't been caught and it appears the murderer is laughing at the town's mess because of him. The cops discuss potential areas to find him, but the police can't do it so the local criminals try to get in the act. It gets so serious in the town that men talking to girls on the streets is taken as an act of accusing crime. The first gripping words come from a child girl - Just you wait a little while, the nasty man in black will come with his little chopper, he will chop you up... which becomes an allusion to the plot. The movie reminds me of a blend between In Cold Blood and To Kill a Mockingbird in a visual style with disreputable murders. It lacks a vast appearance of Lorre as the murderer in the first half keeping his attendance trepid. Lang uses an interesting way to finish a movie about a man with a mental issue of chasing little girls by free will and responsibility.

Final Grade: B+/A-

Cape Fear (1991)
Starring Robert De Niro, Nick Nolte, Juliette Lewis, Jessica Lange, Joe Don Baker

Film Prophet's Review...
A tattooed psychopath, De Niro, is released from his fourteen years in prison to quarry on his former defense lawyer, Nolte, his wife, Lange, and his daughter, Lewis, who does not remember him from the exact case from the beginning. In the De Niro's character's point of view, he is fixated with losing fourteen years of his life and there has to be something to make up for it... has last personal memory outside the sentencing, his attorney, unethical on civil liberties, perhaps. His character creates what a villain is supposed to be: smart, takes pain, vengeful, smokes huge cigars while laughing it up, semantic, straightforwardly terrorizes his foe's life, and even drives a fancy corvette. Nolte's life and family is in absolute danger. He stalks on location with a motionless gaze and disappears with ease unsightly. Here's the humorous part that was a main reason to watch this movie, when he gawks, the melody beats in. Elmer Bernstein made a tribute score to the legendary Bernard Herrmann from the original film with Gregory Peck and boy did it even work completely. It is the most captivating and best element in the film as it is recognizable and its just four repeating notes. Something is up when that tune plays. The Simpsons have used the score and the film's premise in their titled episode, Cape Feare, as the Thompsons. The film has superb acting... De Niro was Oscar nominated as well as Juliette Lewis who is the adolescent daughter of Nolte where De Niro awakens her curious sexual thinking composing an interesting chemistry. Scorsese's directing does a well job, but it's not among his best. During the end, he crafts panic in claustrophobic situations, though the ultimate drama and intensity is not featured to his conventional measures.

Final Grade: B

Constantine (2005)
Starring Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz, Shia LaBeouf, Djimon Hounsou, Tilda Swinton

Film Prophet's Review...
From an unneeded adaptation based on a DC/Vertigo Hellblazer comic book series, John Constantine, Reeves, is a man who dabbles in the occult and teams with a female police officer, Weisz, to fight subversive evil forces. Constantine is haunted by his permanent sin of a past suicide attempt and tries to do all he can to make it to heaven when his life ends, so he cures selected people affected by exorcism. The story is externally paranormal and no one knows what's going on really in the story. First of all, the comic book was not popular enough to be considered making it into a film... let it remain in the comics. Seriously, less than half of the people who saw this on opening weekend haven't looked at a comic of it. Unfortunately, the Constantine character was too plain just like Reeves himself. This is his suitable role where the movie doesn't ask him to do anything serious and lets the visual effects do the work around him. It's the type of movie where he can only do now, except he's not very well at them. I wouldn't want the world's fate to rest in the hands of him. Shia's personality as his cab driver in the film was enjoyable as usual, though a popcorn movie is all it's for. The far more adventurous trailer was terrible and saying nothing relevant to the plot, so only society imagined it would be a plot-less, waste of money on effects film, in which they were correct because the script did nothing for anything. The human antagonists aren't given sufficient time to be bad by any means as they become irrelevant and forgettable. The dystopia conventions were ridiculous... the plot moves at an incredibly slow rate with poor conversations and dialogue... speak up! The CGI effects needed better contrast lighting, even though its demons and anguish, and the camera angles and reaction shots were terrible. Inspiring screenwriters can't find anything here. Viewers, on the other hand, would be eager to see this if they aren't bothered by dull dialogue, supernatural creatures, Reeves, and seeing powers that are unrealistic to the real world with a slow story. Mostly, the movie consisted of coughs, deaths, warping with flying beetles, fire, drowning, and faints, which all weren't cleverly done. Hellboy and Val Helsing of last year were fifty times better. The biblical context of casting spells resembled an exorcist gone bad making little attempt to make sense.

Final Grade: D

Hitch (2005)
Starring Will Smith, Eva Mendes, Kevin James, Amber Valletta, Julie Ann Emery

Film Prophet's Review...
Hitch, Smith, is a professional matchmaker who gives successful tips to men who constantly slip near likable women, such as listen and respond during a date. Providing them interpretations on women's fibs and how to reaction in a situation, he lectures a lesson over the introduction of the film. Remaining in the fact to be attentive to women, the movie has attention as well to the enjoyable movie and lyrical script. "Just one shot to make a difference." The focal point is on his main guy, Kevin James, where Hitch teaches him thriving impressions to a woman, Valletta, but this guy messes up on the little things like spilling drinks and slobbing on a jacket. There are scenes where Hitch comes out as a hero, making the key stirring flirtatious conversation that ignites a date with a woman away from the obnoxious. The movie pitches results back that the flawless people of all are never seamless. Hitch is a cool dating consultant, but he also has an allergic reaction. Eva's character is a gossip columnist, but never wants to admit to her co-workers she likes a man. Both are knowledgeable and complex on their own careers and when they are combined, Hitch's career is reluctantly threatened by hers. People can get emotionally hurt and the movie examines humane love. "Well, I'm always odd. That's why you married me and that's why I married you." Will Smith is my all-time favorite entertainer. He is among the best one man movie stars in the industry. He has the charm, familiarity, wit, and has proven to be flexible in any genre. Smith is electrifying in every chemistry in the film, unlike Hugh Grant who puts viewers to sleep, and Smith shows his talents at the third quarter mark, which may perhaps be his best performance. Smith as Hitch always has the right style and broom and his character is ahead of the next step. Given the grade based on its genre, the script was clever enough to be an elite, effective comedy romance story. Hitch is an early Chaplin as a talkie.

Final Grade: B/B+

Boys Don't Cry (1999)
Starring Hilary Swank, Chloe Sevingny, Peter Sarsgaard, Brendan Sexton III, Alicia Goranson

Film Prophet's Review...
In a rural town in Nebraska, a true tale of Teena Brandon, Swank, goes by Brandon as a boy's name who had women adoring him with his strange charming innocence, although, he wasn't the person they thought he was. Back at home where he moved from, he was a different person in a personal crisis. He made mistakes and when he trespassed between his new love Lana, Sevingny, she's trapped as an outsider and a victim of unjust crime. The movie is renowned in excess of Hilary Swank's Oscar win as the first words of the movie come from her that were shorter hair. She's the voice of the story. Viewed as a boy in early sight, her image appears as a resilient boy, though she's really a female in courage to be different around surrounding dangers. Monster certainly copied the beginning scenes from this film with the roller skating rink and female hooking up, or maybe that's just the common place for that to occur. "You are not a boy." It filled the mediocre drama elements - trailers, abuse, brawls, sirens, cigs, rape, mental cases, and agony. The film pictures a world as rude and brutal for survival against people who don't like other's optimism and trust in dreams. Brandon is stuck in her gender she doesn't want and in result, she has a nightmare life in the subsequent half. Sarsgaard was amazing in his usual sustaining roles, who is brash and steals cars. Besides from Swank, a performance I was stunned with was from Chloe Sevigny; picture a current day Evan Rachel Wood, alluring eyes and face in a tranquil attitude as Brandon's love interest, terrified into a mess of family frustrations. Her effort has depth as she did get an Oscar nomination as she was the one who got my initial attention. Irony of liars, the homophobic uneducated degenerate tolerance and unwanted acceptance that is emotionally disturbed as its unsettling for the characters. Though, they did not feed it pass the screen to the viewers. It's sensitive and truthful, mostly poor lighted in areas and the story has been done on television, but television doesn't put in the careful thought and make the right casting moves. The second half centers around the acting and this particular cast made it work. It has several violent and unsettling scenes where the acting stands out the most.

Final Grade: B-

After the Sunset (2004)
Starring Pierce Brosnan, Salma Hayek, Woody Harrelson, Naomie Harris, Don Cheadle

Film Prophet's Review...
After a final diamond heist, a FBI agent on shoddy terms follows the pair to an island where he attempts to entice them in another. Brosnan and Hayek's characters are a wild, loving couple about to retire it seems and a failed before to catch them agent Harrelson waits to get them by luring them to big diamond. Brosnan appears to be bored and needs a hobby, but he really just wants to have fun still. As the two male characters get more closely acquainted, as this is the majority of the film, the viewers begin wonder who will be tricking who. I had the guilty pleasure of wanting to see Hayek's appealing character, who was satisfying. The worn premise and Hayek convinced me to watch this film, plus Cheadle as a minor villain who was superb, but he wasn't a huge part of the story. This story begins where most heist movies end where the thief and his lady head to a tropical island after their last score, but there's a ship boarded near the island for a few days containing a major diamond they haven't stole, renewing a new cat and mouse game of friendship and suspicion between Brosnan and Harrelson. Los Angeles is glorified with a heap of celebrities in the opening scene that doesn't feature Kobe Bryant on the Lakers, but has Shaq, Malone, and coach Jackson on the team, which is ironic because Kobe is just there now. Anyways, the crew toys with an expensive movie who seem to have had fun making this film using equipment to their advantage, stunt work, and plot trickery and schemes. It tries to earn some cheap laughs that did somewhat work. The movie reminds me of The Score, except this one is more amusing because of the Brosnan and Harrelson friendly, ingressive angle. Although nothing provocative, a team of semi-stars generate a concise enjoyment.

Final Grade: C+/B-

Maria Full of Grace (2004)
Starring Catalina Sandino Moreno, Yenny Paola Vega, Guilied Lopez, John Alex Toro, Patricia Rae

Film Prophet's Review...
Stimulating, scary movie that isn't really intended to be... a fresh, new beautiful face in cinema, Moreno, vastly worthy of getting her debut Oscar nomination and blessed with natural beauty, is a young, recently found out pregnant Colombian girl who is adventurous and accepts a risky trafficking offer to get a job that makes a lot of money by leaving her country, smuggling drugs to New York, but the ploy is she has to swallow drug pellets, being careful with prevailing circumstances. Temptations are for individuals only serving one's self, which means it won't appeal to anyone else. Not all temptations lead into correct moral choices. In her case, she is demonstrating a dicey temptation, helping others too oddly enough for the wrong cause, but not all negatively. The poster image is not fully presented in the film as it represents symbolism for Maria's crucible job from the exploitation of jealous and striving young Colombian girls, like her self and her best friend who are tempted, and the awful job opportunities in Colombia in which a flower plantation job is considered a success. From the first scene, Film Prophet admired the music score that was effective during the epoch without amazing, unnecessary special effects. Most of the words are processed in the character's heads as we see them thinking and pondering and the astonished story is partly expressed in the acting and direction with miraculous outcomes. When the talk arrives every minute, it's greatly consuming and the script advances every time. The movie struck my fear of swallowing large pills and in the scene where she had to practice with grapes was very striking and relative to my phobia and also the chance of losing airport luggage. It's very scary at times and this is not a screaming horror movie at all, which often fail at being scary. Pure pain, no guns. Picture the creepy dentist scene in Marathon Man, matched with the intensity level at 400 Blows and the unforeseen The Motorcycle Diaries flow that is equivalent to a mind boggling, genuine movie. I was amazed at the obscene possible numbers leading to the question of why as it was hard to figure picturing one's self in her situation, but Moreno traps the attention into her character and affects the viewers and makes us suffer with her. Film Prophet was nervous for her! Initially seen for her performance, it turns out the film was moving with deep contemplation. I was completed impressed and didn't imagine to get this much from it.

Final Grade: A/A-

The Motorcycle Diaries (2004)
Starring Gael Garcia Bernal, Rodrigo De la Serna, Mercedes Moran, Jean Pierre Noher

Film Prophet's Review...
Based on a true story from a travel diary, collecting observations of community and public, kept and written by Che Guevara, Bernal, when he was twenty-three years old, accompanied by his friend Alberto Granado, Serna, on a motorcycle voyage around South America to Venezuela in time for Alberto's birthday. Che is a medical student and Alberto is a pilot and both have similar inspirations and dreams set out during the time of post-war, but when the film is over, their destinies change. Beginning on a bumpy track looking for girls and adventure, they have no money which results in occurrences of little stints to get money and scams to get food from people looking like hypnotists, or sometimes Che helps stick strangers as a favor looking like missionaries. Their motorcycle ungainly falls down with them on in need of repairs. They could have stayed home in Argentina and ignored the struggle to a tiring survival outdoors incredibly going no where so far. They later gain knowledge in certain areas of the country and become more serious about life. In his diary expressed by commentary and narration, he stimulates the notion of social freedom and its in this voyage, Che in particular, gets to see evolution of himself and Alberto into genuine humans surrounding by other feeble, but caring people. It's similar to the direction of the movie Easy Rider, without the overdose of hippie drugs. The cinematography blended in however, it tends to shine at spots. Although, the most vulnerable part was the shakiness of the camera and rushing into the story. There isn't a coherent plot, but that's okay because that's what the movie is progressing on by putting us in the lives of the two as both of them and the audience do not know what will become, leaving the story open as pleased. In a history perspective, Che becomes part of finding government connected to Castro defying socialism from his widespread views in many parts of peaceful land ruined by armed intruders. "I'd like you to stay like this... silent." At most, the film was quiet so there are scenes that will surge chills like what the wonderful guitar score did for the film. A memorable chilling scene was the few minutes before the certain swim on the thanks speech by Che as its in Alberto's face the audience sees Che's glimpse of his foreshadowing admired, friendly forthcoming.

Final Grade: B

Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998)
Starring Nick Moran, Jason Statham, Dexter Fletcher, Jason Flemyng, Vinnie Jones, P.H. Moriarty

Film Prophet's Review...
An assortment of artificial characters in London are brought together by coincidence when a young man loses half a million pounds in a card game. He has a week to get the money or else they face losing some fingers. He and his three other friends decide to steal from a gang who are planning to rip off a bunch of other gangs without being caught. British director and writer Guy Ritchie has similar misdemeanor knacks in his films as in Snatch. Such similarities share a male dominated cast without one being any type of a well-known name, obscurity in dealing with their poorly executed accents from the United Kingdom, too hard to comprehend everything until people start dying rapidly, and removes all logic and reality. Fans of the movie seem to be impressed with characters of their low IQ because maybe they can relate to them. Basically, they aren't living a decent life so they have to rob from gangs who steal like them and put them through pain and suffering using knifes and expensive guns and on the side, they gamble with cards and the movie is terrible at demonstrating this with slow-motion, up-tight camera views. Ritchie blatantly establishes intelligence and thought while the actors didn't sell their roles and the viewer can't buy into the story completely as Moran is the shoddier part among the worst acted movies ever created. The characters come from no where without introduction because they eventually die leaving no emotions behind as that's not the problem. In the movie's pernickety cinematic accounts, goofs are trap in trouble and add some appalling violence and dialogue about killing that wants to be tough. A reason is that they think they are smart at organizing plans, but it's just miserable listening to their harms. Keeping up with the plot complications that are too slow before the movie actually does anything of enjoyment is a bit delicate with three gangs happening, but don't worry, the movie slightly raises the lever. "Well this seems to be a waste of my time." The fuss was overly done with men shouting at each other and it's not a sharp mob film, but a crime comedy, except there was nothing to laugh at besides the outcome of the movie which was a dismal failure to resolve. Another problem is there were too many characters who checkmate each other, figuring out who is on what side. "Your stupidity might be a one saving grace."

Final Grade: C-

The Phantom of the Opera (2004)
Starring Gerard Butler, Emmy Rossum, Minnie Driver, Patrick Wilson, Miranda Richardson

Film Prophet's Review...
It's about the music and the soundtrack that's what brought Film Prophet to pitch in. The music is taken directly from the most popular American musical opera. Film Prophet has seen the live opera in person as Film Prophet flashbacked to that time while viewing parts of this film and relating it to the play, and knows the true artists and work is done there, so put to the screen was a test for Andrew Lloyd Webber, who commits to the story. The disadvantage to the movie as to the play is that audience can't view the whole set at once because the camera limits it and that's part of filming a story, but Webber is in favor of secured close-ups rather than a point of view shot from the seats at any point. It's delightful in listening to the voices even though sometimes the words are out-stretched and can't be understood. However, the entire movie is in lip-sync as if it was a music video, which makes the live stage play natural and eminent. The rendition can be basically heard than seeing it. The story is notorious. A man, Butler, with partly deformed face hidden in a half mask is in love with a rising star during a romantic musical epic where he roams an underground of an old century Paris opera house as he tutors a beautiful young soprano, Christine, Rossum, who takes the place of the opera's most beloved singer, Carlotta, Driver. The Phantom thinks he has found love until Christine's childhood boyfriend, Vicomte de Changy, Wilson, enters the play. Not an easy nor difficult story to perform... it's a stage musical spectacle with romantic moments. The story opens correctly like the play with the auction of the glowing chandelier, the most sighted object piece ever in a musical, years after the event of the play began. The mesmerizing, famous harden Phantom score that everyone is familiar with is still unforgotten, effective, loud, and amiable. The commencement is captivated by the music's tempo. On the contrary, it plummets afterwards into tiresome scenes that were low and over-extended. For viewing contentment, the casting was originally likeable for only one member, who is Emmy Rossum. It turned out Film Prophet was actually surprised with Minnie Driver's pleasant charming effort, which was in fact striking with her charisma flair when the film regressed.

Final Grade: C+

Sideways (2004)
Starring Paul Giamatti, Thomas Haden Church, Virginia Madsen, Sandra Oh

Film Prophet's Review...
The movie concerns two friends on a week long winery trip through the California country before one of them is about to get married. Jack, Haden Church, is a voice-over actor and loves his soon to be wife, but panics about the loss of being a bachelor and pressures himself to find sex before the Saturday of marriage. It is through the suggestion of his best friend and best man, Miles, Giamatti, that the two go on this wine trip on the country side. Miles is a failed author currently teaching English, snatched in a mess as an alcoholic who went through a divorce two years ago as he is unable to move on. Creator Alexander Payne shows an art in detailing the horrible and colorful nature of people's everyday lives while finding exquisiteness on a wine tasting road trip that outlines post-maturity and delicacy. Acquainted chats during their sessions on their tour rumbling on about trying to have a great week and spending time together acting like conversationalists occurs. The main cast's characters are all wine experts and know more than the audience. Giamatti gave a surprising turn from last year's American Splendor. Giamatti and Church's talks withdraws each other out which gives Madsen the best personal attraction to the story and her addition to the story brings the attention back in after the first dozen of minutes. It was problematical to establish a point of view since the characters weren't given sufficient time to be devoted from the start, not until the movie develops, like the script... really enduring. It needed a little more time and then it erupted fruitfully. The bare weakness was the grating, incessant score that carries on for too long and sounded something from a second-rate Nintendo game based from a cartoon, but even that gradually gets better. There is an exceptional sense of humor and the cinematography is dazzling as the movie improves each minute. "I'm so insignificant, I can't even kill myself... you can't kill yourself before you're published." The best scenes are when Giamatti and Madsen are sit on the porch as Madsen says a metaphorical speech on why she likes wine, the part on the golf course where yards away, another golf cart hits their cart, and Jack crying about how he left his wallet at a waitress' house. It's most likely the best movie that can recover along with the comedy and each upcoming scene is impressive as it persists. The message of the movie is enjoying the mood clear of mistakes and to learn how to examine wine in a glass.

Final Grade: A-

In Good Company (2004)
Starring Dennis Quaid, Topher Grace, Scarlett Johansson, David Paymer, Clark Gregg, Selma Blair

Film Prophet's Review...
A magazine advertising executive, Quaid, finds himself working for a new, younger boss, Grace, following a corporate merger with a team that has a constant fear that someone will be fired. The two learn from cooperating with each other for a positive outcome and begin forming a friendship that is upset when the young boss has an affair with the daughter, Johansson, of Quaid's character. There are a lot of one-liners and sight gags including surprised looks from Quaid at ill at ease encounters. "You kids ready to come in for dinner?" The direction and cinematography is very average setting the story up pure and easy. Quaid's character is old and regressing and everyone around him is moving up. Grace's character is young and progressing as it appears the two flipped positions. Every other scene someone takes a fall or rise that evidently changes their frame of mind. It's a nice story about a happy family and short incidents of humor that hinder. The film's drama isn't immense, but the acting performances turn a fair screenplay and its dialogue into a fine, captivating watch. Grace and the cast tuned Film Prophet in through the movie. The Grace-Johnansson affair angle attracts the movie's viewers because of Johansson's appeal and talents as it is easy to fall in love with her. Compared to Naomi Watts, her acting in the slightest role can still put a smile on Film Prophet's face. The angle was an amazing add-in and arrangement to elevate the story. "I heard this rumor that alcohol impairs your judgment." The script contains irony of expenses, age, maturity, goals, and evolution wonderfully, like the music, in relation to envy, rebounding, and security. "Timing is everything in life." Simplicity is its charm with a scrutinized, astonished ending and the film is entirely delightful.

Final Grade: B/B+

Before Sunset (2004)
Starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy

Film Prophet's Review...
"Happiness is in the doing... There's got to be more to love than commitment." Nine years ago, two strangers met by chance on a train and spent the night together in Vienna and parted before sunrise. They're about to cross paths again for the first time since then at Hawke's last book tour stop in Paris where they will have the venture to find out what might have been. The problem is they have just a few hours before Hawke's plane leaves. They play the catch up game walking around in Paris in a low budget setting for eighty minutes, the length of the movie, to rekindle a subtle story. The attention goes in and out of the film through their very long chats between each other, which is dawdling. The story centers around only two characters, Hawke and Delpy, as they are basically the only performers who get to do anything useful as they try to carry the full story without anything else that's special going on screen. Both had the ability to memorize long conversations while walking towards a camera as it backs up in view. Sooner or later, their voices become annoying since they are the only two talking back and forth utterly. The small Indie film is non-violent, no action with guns, but people watch movies to see explosions, fights, or some drama, but nothing else is present and nothing exterior interferes. Hawke's character is a mess and needed to relax as he is quirky, frantic, excited, and surprised throughout the whole film. He cracks minor sarcastic jokes to continue to lighten up the discussions that aren't funny at all and Delpy is not amused either. In a nutshell, they figure out, move along modernly with an ordinary acquaintance of chatting. Neither are compelling, adorable characters... both lead rather dull lives filled with unfulfilling romances. They scarcely resolve anything as there's no need for a tense conflict to be determined step by step because no new truths are discussed, neither are in pain, but they feel trapped by responsibilities and mistakes. The movie takes life as it is poetic and naturalistic along with a second chance that could capture the connection which ultimately is valuable like time.

Final Grade: C+/C

Million Dollar Baby (2004)
Starring Clint Eastwood, Hilary Swank, Morgan Freeman, Jay Baruchel, Brian F. O'Byrne

Film Prophet's Review...
Boxing trainer Frankie Dunn, Eastwood, has been unwilling to let himself get close to anyone including his own daughter. However, Maggie FItzgerald, Swank, walks into his boxing gym one day and continues to hit the bags. In a life struggle, Maggie's gotten herself on raw focus, talent, and force of will. She wants someone to believe in her more than anything else. The last thing Frankie needs is that kind of responsibility and risk, but he is won over by Maggie's pure determination and similar spirit. Redemptive power of sports about a poor boxer is part of the story, and yet, the story has been told a dozen of times in cinema on how a fighter dreams to be victorious through courage and the person and others learn a lesson about life, which makes them all better. Eastwood and Freeman are a pair of old, wise trainers who run a boxing gym. Eastwood is a training coach who is confused about his Christianity. In a softer role, he creates the score and directs the film including starring where his cliché sayings are still present - Girly, tough, ain't enough. The dialogue has some amusing ones with ones involving coherent logic. Freeman's narrations at points can be ignored completely. His character stalks and runs the boxing gym all day, who is in a subplot with a want to be contender who doesn't have the physical ability. Hilary Swank, also known as the next karate kid, is suitable for the position as Maggie. Film Prophet has to admit she was the best addition to the movie. She had the package of herself and her character embodied into a gift. Maggie hangs out in the boxing gym with all men since the place she stays at is terrible. She punches bags until Eastwood notices and admits to train her for matches, going against boxing standard's length of training before a match. Eastwood's direction was paced and viewed well enough for the widespread story not to be dull at any moment. A third way through, he makes sure the viewers are attached to the character's hearts with sympathy and its truly his direction that turns the story into a wonderful, passionate one. It completely blew my expectations from the hole of a boxing film as it was fully inspiring. The fights extract awes that pump amazement... the lighting and camera angles were efficient, much impressive as the swings and choreography which weren't dreary and long with a huge crowd and huge men who can't act. In a men dominated sport, the film establishes a female's point, rather anyone's, marvelously with toughness, hard hits, bleeding, training, sorrowfulness, and pain.

Final Grade: A-

The Assassination of Richard Nixon (2004)
Starring Sean Penn, Naomi Watts, Don Cheadle, Jack Thompson

Film Prophet's Review...
Based on a true event, the story of Samuel Bicke, Penn, purses an American style of living as a sales person who takes very distressed measures to make his mark. After hearing political speeches given by President Nixon on television, Bicke has a different approach to earn a living and money and he is upset about the idea that America is all about money. He hatches a plot to kill Richard Nixon. His attempts to steal and lie for a shameful mission turns weary, but his right ideas lead to bad ones. The movie is purely a motivating watch just for the cast. Penn and Watts reprise in their second on-screen pair together from an honorable favorite, 21 Grams, with the addition of the always welcomed Don Cheadle, apart from this film was a little different. Penn as Bicke is in nearly every frame as an insecure, lonely man with petty narrative pieces in a soliloquy guiding his unnoticed life from power to destroy. He has unusual beliefs into being an unordinary salesman, fasten by racism and his boss, who is indisposed with his business ideas. The dialogue is over-written to make some strong meaning to work on business deals, attempting to make the talks savvy, then cutting to a lonely moment with Bicke in the scene once again as he listens to audio cassettes on how to achieve success by being a fair salesman. The lighting and score were the downers as it's translucent to see the walls had stains and the grass was dying in a sultry and dry atmosphere. It was a bit slow in opening the plot or moving the story towards an aim, and so the cast carries the attention. Watts, Film Prophet's favorite actress, has dyed brown hair as a separated housewife who is still magnificent in her approaches, looks, and delivering lines out with an alluring voice ready to explode at any moment even with the slightest role as a bar waitress. Being honest with himself, Bicke plans from being a nobody who was desperate to be a somebody, while the ending was strong, but awkward. The movie hasn't got any publicity heading under the radar quietly because like Bicke, a few people care to notice the feature.

Final Grade: B-/C+

The Aviator (2004)
Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Alan Alda, Cate Blanchett, Kate Beckinsale, Alec Baldwin, John C. Reilly

Film Prophet's Review...
Howard Hughes, DiCaprio, dreamt of making the biggest movies, fastest planes in the sky, and becoming the richest man America will ever see. Presently, he became a famous billionaire for directing Hollywood's most expensive movies, designing the fastest planes with speed records, owning his own aircraft, and romancing heroines. He hooked up with all the prime actresses at the time and the two biggest female stars were Katharine Hepburn, Blanchett, and Ava Gardner, Beckinsale. The casting presented was what the portion of the movie was about and that was stardom and so, the other notable star appearances were Ian Holm, Gwen Stefani, Jude Law, and Willem Dafoe. The three most striking scenes are when Faith Domergue and Ava Gardner's cars encounter one night, a reckless plane disaster landing onto the country club, and Hepburn's fanatic chatter on the golf course... all three include Hughes in those scenes. In personnel means, Scorsese, DiCaprio, and Blanchett capture the ambiance. Scorsese's biopic has established himself even further as becoming the best American motion picture storyteller of all-time. Scorsese matches up to what Hughes did to Hell's Angels aerial shots over vast landscapes by using several different cameras in the sky and desired for perfection. The audience gets their first taste off this production of Hell's Angles of Hughes representing all there was to be for a man as a rebel, engineer, gambler, playboy, and pioneer... the aviator. Scorsese mastered at the cinematography of this film, including getting help from his assistants on the costumes and makeup, let alone, Blanchett definitely looked and spoke much like the actual Katharine Hepburn and her performance was exhilarating and very fun to watch. DiCaprio fuels his dynamic Hughes portrayal with maturity and he shows all sides of his capability to impress the viewers once again in his second Scorsese film. Outside of all the entertainment, hairdos, women, sparkling entrances, and grins, his character has flaws of a knack for being too clean, frustrated over photography and lights blinding him, red meat, and lost in sensible conversation. From the entire glamour scenes, his hard will mind is up against slimy politicians who are competitive as much as Hughes, which at times we see this, he is more than ever panic, stressed out, and a nervous buffering working man with a compulsive illness, but he still insists of keeping the one thing that matters most to him... his reputation with dignity.

Final Grade: A-

Hotel Rwanda (2004)
Starring Don Cheadle, Sophie Okonedo, Nick Nolte, Desmond Dube, Joaquin Phoenix

Film Prophet's Review...
In 1994, some of the worst carnage during mankind took place in the country of Rwanda in an era of radio communications and updated televised news. A million people died within three months. Inspired by his love for his family, the house manager, Cheadle, of an upscale hotel protects guests to escape the massive killings and save the lives of over thousand helpless refugees under his shelter. The star of the movie is Don Cheadle, who I am a fan of, is outstanding in the lead role. I've been waiting to see Cheadle hold a movie as a leading role, except he didn't get a handful of assistance from the fatigue cast beneath him. Phoenix is a news cameraman who appears for a total of about five minutes. The refugees are clueless as to why the slaughters are occurring as the movie shows a true story when a hotel manager can do many great things. He is trustworthy and wealthy with a kind accent, who is dealt inhuman demands, threats of violence, and loads of people who come to his hotel for safety. "Look at them, these are not rebels." In order to protect the people, his gentle approach to diplomatic issue compromises. The rebels with long knifes are portrayed as villains, who think they can rule over the minorities, apart from being the same race. The violence was subtle and the story telling was rather plain, like the cinematography that did not succeed, escorting to an easy setup without much vivid viewing commitment. The criticism of the movie is that the sides are confusing and the viewer could struggle at telling if the UN, US, or any country or army is there to help the people despite race at Rwanda... it's very unclear. The slaughters are ambiguous as well because there isn't a sufficient amount of attention of the occurrence because it just shows the aftermath. The dramatized scenes are hard to connect with the emotional angle too. As I was anticipating misfortune, I couldn't bear characters over-weeping on minor wounds hoping everything will be ok and their fear can end... cue the violin, louder, louder, go cry, they are sad people. Through all the road blocks, street riots, racist tension, helping one another for a moral cause, and anger, they were all exceedingly formless and hazy... the story is important, but the picture doesn't correspond. I sensed an immense setback at the end of this... Cheadle impressively carries the movie, but too bad there isn't one dazzling scene that steps further.

Final Grade: C+

The Life Aquatic (2004)
Starring Bill Murray, Owen Wilson, Cate Blanchett, Willem Dafoe, Jeff Goldblum, Anjelica Huston

Film Prophet's Review...
As a most wanted movie, it was fairly disappointing as it didn't quite get all the buzz it needed to get a push into an elite position, but its recognition vanished... and Film Prophet knows why. Famous oceanographer Steve Zissou, Murray, and his crew of Team Zissou, set sail on an expedition to hunt down the mysterious, and maybe non-existent, Jaguar Shark that ate Zissou's partner during the documentary filming of their latest adventure. They are joined on their next voyage by a young airline co-pilot, Wilson, who could be Steve's son, a journalist, Blanchett, and co-producer, Houston. As during their journey, it is taped for a new documentary. People in Zissou's society who watch his premieres are dull and critical who possess elegance and class while Zissou's dress code for his crew dresses in red knit caps, go shirtless, and wear Speedos when they are on boat. The story doesn't equal the talent on screen, however, the production design in most scenes are fanciful. The deceptive comedy isn't present either visually or during speech with hardly no jokes or entertainment, while the story was heavily focused at the start on one objective of revenge. With a bunch of numerous characters and talents, like Dafoe, there ought to be a few amusing sub-plots, but there weren't. Dafoe and Wilson had a particular accent and costume look unlike their predominant roles and they set for low-key conversations. The objective was forgotten during the filming onboard in minuscule adventures of kidnapping, bankruptcy, action of gun violence with robbers, and sub-par drama with father and son. It's uninteresting because the story sets up too slow and it's still uninteresting when it did develop. They hung out and did a lot of neat stuff with water, but didn't absorb me into the movie as much as I wanted it too. It may well be an adult comedy from the usual obnoxious teen ones, but it got into the little details of the characters and the movie sank a hundred feet under water.

Final Grade: C

Garden State (2004)
Starring Zach Braff, Peter Sarsgaard, Natalie Portman, Ian Holm

Film Prophet's Review...
After spending ten years away from home, a man, Andrew Largeman, Braff, returns to attend his mother's funeral and everyone is glad to see him back in town Zach Braff wrote, directed, and starred in this film as he takes the story close as possible to the interior of Largeman's mind, conveying forgiveness and anesthesia. As a man who is very much unhappy with less emotion living in an empty white bedroom, he doesn't have an interest or care in the world, even during his mother's funeral, then presumably the viewer won't either. The lingo is to some extent ordinary amongst these conventional buddies of his. Meanwhile, profanity occurs on the minute which gets irritating. At a party, they play spin the bottle, inhale some drugs, get wasted, and all this time they seem depressed, but want to deem cheerfulness. So that was the first half hour of the film and the dialogue improved and got pleasant, but most important, one actress in particular, even though Sarsgaard was fine, raised the quality of this story's picture. I find it awkward in some movies where the best piece is usually an electrifying supporting performance, distinctive from the leading characters, arrives within the story later. Natalie Portman's first scene, character Sam, with Braff, caused a gigantic smile on my face as she lit up every scene, even the ones where she is in the background. There was unsatisfying entertainment during the period without her and her charisma effectively pulled me back in when I was at the peak of tuning out. She emerged to not only make me happy at last, but Largeman himself as well. As versatile as she is, I felt and connected with her vibe. Her lovable character is a girl who Film Prophet would like to come across one day much so. Largeman and Sam's chemistry reminds me of Lost in Translation's two main stars as follows where they are just enjoying life. The movie has an unique style of grabbing one's interest of a sense of humor too, and if one grasps it, the movie will come as a value. They did acts people never have done before in order to ease pain of a weird situation. The message is it's alright to do something no one has done before as long as one expresses love in his or her life. One scene pictures the three in the rain screaming in a void, check out the poster for a look, which gave me goose bumps down my legs. "Goodbye Tim - Peace out player."

Final Grade: B+/B

Wild Strawberries (1957)
Starring Victor Sjostrom, Ingrid Thulin, Bibi Andersson, Gunnar Bjornstrand, Naima Wifstrand

Film Prophet's Review...
Professor Isak Borg, Sjostrom, is on a car trip to receive an honorary degree for his long time work as a doctor. On his way, he decides to visit places that had played roles in his life during his younger days. Accompanied by his daughter in law Marianne, Thulin, he stops at his family's summer house and the town in which he previously worked as a doctor. His remembrance of his past becomes more intimate when he picks up a young girl hitchhiker, Andersson, with two young men who bear a resemblance to Borg's first love. Isak Borg is humane with his faults and on bound to accept the inevitability of his death approaching with renewal in his belief of existence. As Marianne tells Borg, people most close to him have called him ruthless, selfish, and filthy rich. Conversely, the viewers never see any reason to think so and why to believe this because he is empty and sad. Wild Strawberries title is such a magnificent reference to a fruit in a garden field to show an image of happiness and the Swedish movie does it well by very clear reminisces on Borg's memories ala A Christmas Carol, distant of reality on what the title means and this is where the viewer gets to understand his true past of youth and his affection on his substantial family. It's just not him on why people dislike him as the story reflects reasons to his melancholy state and the direction presents it great. Film Prophet gives appreciation to the direction of the dreams he has as it is the best nightmare sequences ever in a movie directing to things resembling his dying stage where it's deeply poetic with abstract symbolism. The movie's pace attracted me along with the talk and carefully, solicitous screen write which has a fascinating story as Film Prophet was tuned into the beautiful visuals. I found the sarcastic dialogue at few moments intelligent and there are scenes that make more sense representing Borg's position. It's alluring and I couldn't miss a thing and the story gets better each scene with it's use of artistic displays and symbolic references showing his part of general disconnect with humanity. The score fits the ambiance beautifully in which the wonderful cinematic setting is quite astounding and peaceful. "Goodbye father Isak... can't you see you're the one I love? Today, tomorrow, and forever." Everyone prevailed in their serious performances and the finest was Sjostrom's authentic character of Isak Borg. The sound effects are really special. At one scene, it can be in a lonely area with quiet sound, and then perfectly centers on other sounds whether its wind, rain, cracking of an object, or bird's chirping. I was greatly impressed at director Ingmar Bergman's movie, a very influential person in cinematic history where most of today's cult movies can be looked back on his work and this movie expresses powerful themes of nostalgia, times, and death and it's easily among the best directed movies ever made. "All along the line, there's nothing but cold and death and loneliness. It must end somewhere."

Final Grade: A+/A

The Asphalt Jungle (1950)
Starring Sterling Hayden, Jean Hagen, Louis Calhern, James Whitmore, Sam Jaffe, John McIntire

Film Prophet's Review...
For a tough guy, Hayden, his thoughts of rural escape is hard to carry out in a movie with shady characters who are trying to survive so they plan a deal when a criminal mastermind, Jaffe, is released from jail and arranges a crime lark. Though, he doesn't have all the sources and money he needs, so he turns to a bookie who approaches a lawyer for money, but he has problems of his own. As they trace their struggles on others, they begin to have a number of troubles that delay the plan... and most excitement in the movie. Director John Huston balances the atmosphere of cleanness of elegant dress and wealth to a dirty, decayed urban environment of scare buildings with hardly anyone around where they can be found in private rooms with cigarette smoke and alcohol. It has what a mastermind criminal plot needs, however, it's far from being a great noir because it doesn't pull the viewer in. Everything is not simple as it appears. The plot is addressed mainly in many talks between the men and matters with offers and jobs that continue on to a new person to finalize everything. The setback of the film is the talk is quiet and somewhat mediocre and not only is there petite action, there is no music at all to keep the viewer from departing and phasing out of what's going on. It reminds me a lot of Kubrick's The Killing where the posse are in need of money, making plans, on time arrangements, keeping in touch, cutting deals to lure men into a plan, and asking for cooperation, but nothing happens to let us know reasons on what they are obliging to exactly and the movie is stuck in this stage for a long time. There's no catch. The women are inarticulate to the plot as they are not alluring as noirs turn out to be sometimes. The women's involvement hardly exists and makes no difference while they are found in their apartments serving no significance, apart from adding females to the film and expanding a movie's fundamentals down. Then again, the brightest spots of the movie are when pre-star Marilyn Monroe sparks her small amount of scenes up in a movie that has few of them.

Final Grade: C/C+

Kinsey (2004)
Starring Liam Neeson, Laura Linney, Peter Sarsgaard, Chris O'Donnell, Tim Curry, Oliver Platt

Film Prophet's Review...
"The idea that men need sex is a lie." The movie puts the desire to learn back in an education. Sex has definitely carried a matter at the end of last year at the theaters. At a look of life through behavioral studies, Alfred Kinsey, Neeson, is a pioneer in the area of human sexuality research as his publication of his book, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, was among the first recorded works that saw science address sexual behavior - one third of men experience pre-martial sex. As a child, his father, John Lithgow, wants the same engineering direction for his son like him in his senior position at work. The tormented Kinsey tries to mimic his father as he wants to study biology. "My daughter is too fat to get a husband." As a professor, Kinsey offered a marriage course as interest in human sexuality is produced by his students that lead to personal interviews thus he began conducting questioning and observing data from sexual behavior and interprets them in a scientific way. Kinsey was the first scientist to pretentiously make sex safe for study, as he used science lectures constantly in every day speech. He was very embraced, wanted to experience it all, and turns it into a project. Of course, a successful single-minded man must have his turmoil with the media and the film delivers the tone well as people can be offended and sex at times is painful as there is a need for intimacy. The use of black and white color on his interview about his life as a narrative origin starts the movie. Many insightful views about living orgasms on Earth and how diverse they are in the most smallest ways came from him. "To see them, you simply have to open your eyes." The classy direction on the notorious subject without creating it unsettling, rather interesting and witty was magnificent. Behind the attentive music and story, what shines is the acting driven from the script. Every cast member had the ability to make the characters as real as possible as it excels greatly. There are powerful, motivating lines that make up such an enlightening script. Surprises and secrets taken from this script have averse turns and make it by no means of tedious as the movie dramatizes the topic in extravagant detail. There are some clever visual humorous parts where most come in bed. "It's impossible to measure love and without measurements, there can be no science review." The intractable connection between love and sex as a puzzle could give heaps away, but there's plenty of more in the movie.

Final Grade: A

Mogambo (1953)
Starring Clark Gable, Ava Gardner, Grace Kelly, Donald Sinden, Philip Stainton

Film Prophet's Review...
A motion picture directed by John Ford features a love triangle in an adventure and romance. Film Prophet wanted to get a sight of Ava Gardner, who has natural beauty like a Natalie Wood, in a movie and combined with Ford, Gable, and Kelly, I made this one the choice in a rare feature... or maybe I just haven't seen an another fresh movie with Gable or Kelly in a long time. Not much is really happening in the story. It's flippantly, not heavy, and slow paced. Gable traps vicious animals in Kenya and most of the setting is a jungle and safari. However, the skirmish is not attracting attention until the chemistry with Gable and two women occur. The aging Gable is the man when it comes to roles involving fascinating sagas. His character never seems to find much interest into the heroine character as he only responds with quaint one-liner remarks until the story evolves. Gardner, as she puts it, is over-stimulating, with disagreements to desired wants. Grace's first appearance was jaw-dropping because she finally arrived a bit late in the film, but then released a lot of temper as Gardner feels she is losing him. The cinematography doesn't capture much zest and narrative aspects. There's a lot of still frames unnecessary with no talk, mainly because the film is out in the nature to represent how quiet and calm things are until humans interact with it. There's a great deal of frightening wildlife creatures. From that comes a major downgrade to the sound of animal's roars, but that's not the only part of the nature. Plaintive chants of warriors from various tribes try to add realism to the landscape environment even though it gets annoying as the Africans are irritating with their recitals. Wildlife and romance co-existing does not formulate a quality film.

Final Grade: C/C-

National Treasure (2004)
Starring Nicolas Cage, Sean Bean, Diane Kruger, Justin Bartha, Jon Voight, Harvey Keitel

Film Prophet's Review...
Ben Gates, Cage, is an archaeologist looking for a legendary lost treasure spurred by an intimate story he was told as a child by his grandfather. He tells Ben the secret of the hiding place for the treasure is encoded on the back of the Declaration of Independence placed there by the founding fathers. No one would believe Ben of course, so he and his friend, with Kruger's character involved as well, go on a treasure hunt against an ex-friend, Bean, turned enemy astute on his track who wants the treasure for himself. There are some side jokes throughout all the continuous games between Cage and Bean's character and the cast is having a tremendous time acting out their roles too. Jon Voight is Ben's father who is not convinced that there is a treasure, but later I was relieved when he stopped being ignorant to his son and followed his son's protagonist beliefs. The movie is an adult portrayal of The Goonies except its not about pirates in one underground location. There is a ship named The Charlotte however which started the pursuit and still has the treasure hunt curiosity to the next step after a clue after another clue. This plot is mainly sited on Washington, New York, and Philadelphia. The set beneath the Trinity church was daunting and incredible. Some ideas were reminiscent from Ocean's Eleven during the stealing of the Declaration by replaying taped videos from a linked laptop for the live security camera crew to watch what's not really happening. There are thoughtful ideas of what American history has laid out for us and the movie worked over a fictional scheme on some of it into an adventure. It contemplated me to look at the American Revolution more closely as Ben finds clues more carefully, since all the trails and signs relied on the character's ability to know a vast amount of American history tales. Clever and fun... unbelievable, but its the type of story that can pass by on screen.

Final Grade: B-

Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971)
Starring Gene Wilder, Peter Ostrum, Jack Albertson, Julie Dawn Cole, Roy Kinnear, Denise Nickerson

Film Prophet's Review...
Charlie Bucket, Ostrum, is a poor boy in a town stirred by a contest of searching for one of five golden tickets hidden in the chocolate bars of Wonka where the winners get a special tour in his chocolate factory. However, it's not just any factory, but one with inventive gadgets and mechanics that makes candy taking place in any child's fantasy world. Charlie got the last ticket and he can pick one person to go with him and he picked his grandfather, who was quite fatigue in bed, but got up singing and dancing after believing the news. The motion picture has a crazed sensation of enjoyment for the visitors as well as for the viewer too... it's a ton of fun and the movie lets the fun out frequently. There are a few kids who have unique personalities who get into the tour. For instance, one girl is a greedy rich brat who is spoiled with a temper and wants just about everything - Hey Daddy, I want an Oompa Loompa... I want you to get me an Oompa Loompa right away. Charlie, on the other hand, is unlike the rest of the children and this is where the theme kicks in. People all face temptations and the ones who survive the longest given that they are sincere are rewarded the everlasting return. With all the delights and sweets the factory has placed to show, the bad kids are transformed into a weird conduct which makes their adult relative upset. The kids and their adult sponsors ask hundreds of questions to Wonka where one of his responses are questions must be submitted in writing. There are many questions for him in addition to many ponders towards the movie itself such as there was a news crew on scene just after Charlie got the last winner. Hey, the room is getting smaller - yields a silly response - No it's not, he's getting bigger, referring to Wonka entering a smaller hallway. Wilder was fantasic and positive and remained calm during wild incidents at his tour by children. Inspiring musical score consisting of a few, kept short for the better, singing scenes, but all in all, they were super including the entertaining Oompa Loompas. The film reminds me of the picture quality in The Wizard of Oz. There's a charming musical score, but not only that, there's many amazing ideas addicted to the production set suitable for all ages commencing timeless imagination. The set design was the most impressive display. A gigantic and colorful entrance to the main part of the factory that's assembled into an all-edible candy land with a chocolate waterfall to just about every scenery with candy constructed is irresistible.

Final Grade: A-/A

The Big Sleep (1946)
Starring Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, John Ridgely, Martha Vickers, Charles Waldron

Film Prophet's Review...
Directed by Howard Hawks in a plot which is involved has many character connections. A dying old man in a house of plants and flowers has two beautiful, uncontrollable daughters who get a blackmail offer and the old man hires a detective to get the blackmailer off them as he follows them through a network of murders. Philip Marlowe, Bogart, is a private detective with dignity and flair, playing the modest man to a set a number of circumstances straight. His character is a classic protagonist who is a sly man in charge of his own ways as Bogart's voice and presence was captivating enough as he was in about every scene. One daughter, Vickers, who is young, fair-haired and as Marlowe says - She tried to sit in my lap while I was standing up. Bacall is the other daughter who is more mature, intriguing, and seductive and has an excellent singing scene. The atmosphere of the film is quite messy through a couple of murders and tailing. Though, there are spiffy lines, interesting characters and danger approaching as it's not all serious because while on the job, Marlowe has a lightly humor dialogue. The center stone is the acting and the best parts come when Marlowe is talking to women who both become flirtatious developing a petite bond as all the women are pulled to his charisma. They are all appealing actresses and he even got a taxi driver's card with her number on it. Well done Marlowe. His ways are baffling, but he is clever with periodic explanations of events. Another thing is the wonderful music in the background that builds the noir tone of the movie with anticipation. Marlowe is drawn into more suspicious characters every twenty minutes or so while the viewers don't notice at first sight what's to come as the plot leads into more mysteriously outcomes.

Final Grade: B

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)
Starring William Holden, Sessue Hayakawa, Alec Guinness, Jack Hawkins

Film Prophet's Review...
A British prisoner of war colonel orders his men to build their Japanese captor a railroad bridge in the jungle. The Japanese agreed upon prisoners to be forced in labor to build them a railway and the focus on the movie was the prisoners who try to work despite everything in their way. The movie opens up with cross signs planted in the ground next to a working railroad and it thrusts an extensive view with plenty of compound talk between the always dirty and wet men. There is no glorification for them except obedience. It's a true incident and horror experience that was brutal and grim. During the movie, it's mentioned that there is a deadline to finish the bridge and they are behind schedule because they spend more time walking around and talking to each other than actually working on the railroad. I do not remember one scene in particular where I can say - There's a part where a group of men are hard at work. Since this, the dialogue was repetitive about carrying out orders from the chief Japanese colonel for over two hours. The movie that won seven Academy awards does a boring job at showing it all. Nothing happened in the movie as there was nothing alluring to me with no sub-plot format. The picture itself is awful, not the story. The message is clear, but the movie does a terrible job at addressing it. The minimal story was stretched for over two hours. The direction was too tight with long calm camera shots that don't usually make sense unless much effort is digested into the talk. One thing that is memorable about the movie is the re-occurring whistling to the railway marching together in harmony. During World War II, allied prisoners of war die building a railway for the Japanese. From that, when the film ends, not one scene can be recalled that had to do with dying until the end. The message is that the prisoners are not slaves, but British men who helped the Japanese. It was disappointing because there's no spectacles, rather just a straightforward historical message about pride.

Final Grade: C-